Tag Archives: LinkedIn

Wise owls: networking

Networking works in different ways for different people – the wise owls are back to share their experiences and preferences.

Metal owl ornaments huddled on a shelf

The parliament has also grown this month, with three new owls offering their maiden contributions: please welcome Louise Bolotin, Michael Faulkner and Nik Prowse, all Advanced Professional Members of the SfEP.

Louise BolotinLouise Bolotin

I’m not a fan of formalised networking. At business networking meetings, the chat to others often feels forced and you’re supposed to have a dinky little elevator speech – it can get quite competitive and if you’re not a slick business type it’s easy to feel your face doesn’t fit.

Most such meetings I’ve attended in the past have involved breakfast and as I don’t usually eat until after 11am and never talk to anyone until I’m fully caffeinated, I long ago stopped inflicting such events on myself.

If you’re not a morning person, find an evening networking event if you can as there is usually a glass of wine on offer and a little booze can be a useful lubricant if you’re hesitant to go up to strangers and introduce yourself.

I haven’t stopped networking, however. I just take a more informal sideswipe at it. And where do I network? Everywhere. Bus stops, trains, the corner shop, the lifts in my block of flats… I make a point of talking to anyone. Networking is much more about building personal relationships, than practising an elevator speech everyone will have forgotten within five minutes. So make it personal. Have a funky business card and spread it around liberally, even in places you wouldn’t think to.

And make yourself memorable. My tip is to say something about yourself that’s not work-related. “I’m Louise, I’m a freelance editor and when I’m off-duty I like going to gigs. Who’s your favourite band?” A bit of small talk and, then, if you think it might be fruitful go in for the kill – subtly. I prefer, however, to see networking as a long game as it takes time to get to know people and understand how you might be able to work together.

Michael FaulknerMichael Faulkner

If you are interested in proofreading dissertations and theses, scour your address book for academic types with contacts in the universities, talk to people who are at or who have recently left uni, and join the alumni family of your own institution (if appropriate) – all with the aim of building a list of current profs across all the disciplines with which you’re comfortable. Then research the institutions’ proofreading policy and make a direct approach by email to each person identified, offering your services with the usual caveats. For a supervisor with language-challenged students, a trusted proofreader who understands the parameters is a time-saving resource, and they will come back again and again and will pass your name around.

Always carry a card and practise a concise pitch, cleverly disguised as small talk, which you can wheel out at any gathering. It’s amazing how many people there are who haven’t a clue what editing is about but who can still offer you work. If you edit fiction, for example, be aware that in any group of people there may well be one or two who have a novel in them, or a friend who writes, or an exercise book of poems at the back of the cupboard.

During the life of any project, get to know your client and, without being a pain, make sure the experience is fun. This will lead to repeat business and a growing network through referrals.
Allocate time-limited slots for daily social networking. LinkedIn is invaluable for cold introductions (‘You don’t know me, but we’re Linked’). Facebook groups and online editors’ organisations are great for accumulating knowledge and widening your list of contacts (and have a look beyond editorial groups at those servicing your target market – an obvious example for a fiction editor is a writers’ organisation with a directory of services for writers).

Finally, I find lots of referrals are generated by constructive engagement on the Society’s forums. Conversations begun there can be carried on by email, and a list of trusted colleagues can be built up quite quickly to whom work can be referred – which of course is a two-way street.

Liz JonesLiz Jones

I find networking easier to stomach if I don’t actually think of it as networking. For me it’s more about having conversations that reveal shared interests or a personal connection, and they can happen anywhere – it doesn’t have to be in the context of a business breakfast at the local work hub, or some other kind of formal networking event.

Some of my most successful ‘networking’, in terms of commissions won and money in my business bank account, has taken place at SfEP conferences or local group meetings, over coffee. Other ‘networking’ has happened on Twitter, and the connections I’ve made there have tended to be people who might share a professional specialism, yet have responded to me for some of the more offbeat, non-editorial things I share. This goes to show that there’s scope to relax and be yourself. In fact, I would argue that it’s essential. Not everyone will ‘get’ you, but those who do will truly value what you have to offer.

Another source of interaction that might classify as ‘networking’ has been via my blog, which often veers away from the strictly informational, editorial type of post and into the personal – and conversations arise from that. Again, not everyone will like it, but many people appreciate the honesty and like knowing that there’s a real person behind my website, who will take proper human care over their work. A final thing about networking: the editorial world is surprisingly small. Be nice to everyone (or if you can’t be nice, keep quiet). Give it a few years, and that newbie editorial intern you were patient with could turn out to be the publishing director… and with luck, they’ll still be sending work your way, and suggesting that their staff do too.

Sue LittlefordSue Littleford

I am a very reluctant networker. Not for me attending functions and introducing myself to strangers. But I refuse to feel guilty that I take a more sotto voce approach. I may not get the wide visibility that the more active marketers achieve, but I’m okay with that.

There are, however, small things you can do. A couple of Christmases ago, I sent out cards to my contacts, as I usually do (most of my work is repeat business). At the last moment, I popped a business card in each envelope. Hey presto – two clients I’d not worked with for a few months promptly booked me in straight after Christmas (mentioning it was getting my card that made them contact me), and I’ve worked several more times for each one since.

I always have at least a couple of business cards on me when I leave the house. You simply never know who you’re going to bump into – at a reunion recently, a friend I’d not seen for ages wanted to pass on my details to someone she knew. Easily done with the card I gave her.
At an SfEP conference I got talking to one of the speakers, who duly asked for my card – which, fortunately, I had on me. That got me more than half a dozen books to copy-edit.
I do do social media – mostly Facebook and Twitter. I got very grumpy with the discussion groups on LinkedIn, but I do keep an inactive profile there that I remember to update once in a blue moon, and if I’ve had a good interaction with someone in a Facebook editors’ group, I’ll eventually get over to LinkedIn and offer to link with that person. I’ve not got any jobs from my social media (so far as I know), but for me it’s more about adding to my online presence to give prospective clients a feel for me as a copy-editor.

If you’re a happy active networker, great. If you’re not, don’t despair – small actions can work very well indeed.

Nik ProwseNik Prowse

There is more than one reason to network as an editorial freelance, and they serve different purposes. It’s not a case of ‘today I will do some networking’ but rather having an open mind about anyone you encounter in a business context. Part of this does involve actively seeking out a person with the aim of securing work, but it may just be a case of not turning your back on a working relationship that hasn’t always gone smoothly.

If you work with someone who you don’t get along with, not cutting your ties, not telling them what you think in a way that ends that relationship, may well serve you better in the long run than expressing your feelings in the present. You may decide that you don’t want to work with that particular person again, but keeping your bridges unburnt will keep the door open. The way a person comes across or acts can be the result of the organisation they are working within. In the future, that person may move to a different company with a different outlook. They may remember you and look you up, offering work. You might change your mind about perceived interpersonal difficulties if you find yourself short of work. Or the person may have a much more pleasant colleague whom they suggest you to, which could lead to a different, more fruitful relationship.

Keep doors open once a job is finished. I always aim to end a project on an upbeat note, perhaps with a cheery email to say how much I’ve enjoyed the work, wishing them good luck with the remainder of the production process and indicating my availability for the coming weeks. There are often projects in the pipeline. I work especially hard at this if it’s the first job for a new client, because repeat work is the Holy Grail in this instance. If your contact doesn’t have any work coming up, perhaps a colleague does? Often they will offer to circulate your name, or you could ask them to.

Maintaining links with people who work for your clients can sometimes be tricky: jobs change, roles merge (sadly, redundancies happen) and people move on. If I get a whiff of anyone moving on I always ask where to. They may be going to another company – read: potential client – with which you can forge a new connection. Freelancing is a lonely business, and having friendly personal contact with the people you work with (=for) can be rewarding. But it can also be good in terms of networking.

Finally, probably the most personally rewarding type of networking is the sort you do with freelance colleagues, the others at the coal face. This is one of the most valued aspects of my membership of the SfEP, with the local groups and the online community of the forums. This is where problems can be shared, solutions found, ideas started, and friendships made. Recently I made an effort to connect to a lot more editors on Twitter, and it’s made me feel part of a true community.

 

Posted by Abi Saffrey, SfEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.

 

Social media round-up March 2017

In case you missed them, here are some of the most popular links and members’ blogs shared across the SfEP’s social media channels (Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn) in March.

Members’ blogs

Plagiarism: how to spot it and what to do about it by Hazel Bird

The highs and lows of editorial fees (or how not to trip up during rate talk) by Louise Harnby

Fact checking – vital or a waste of time? by Sara Donaldson

What are the types of transcription? by Liz Dexter

The business of editing: a page is a page – or is it? by Richard Adin

London Book Fair 2017 by Catherine Dunn

5 tips to reduce stress and boost productivity by John Espirian

Social media

5 ways to break the vicious circle of newbies

Is writer’s block a real thing, or just a figment of the imagination?

Tracing the birth of words: from ‘open’ to ‘heffalump’

I feel so bad! (The language of feeling guilty)

How to print dyslexia friendly books – and why

13 kinds of grammar trolls we love to hate

What’s logical about English?

Collated and posted by Tracey Roberts, SfEP blog coordinator

SfEP social media round-up January 2017

In case you missed them, here are some of the most popular links and members’ blog posts shared across the SfEP’s social media channels (Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn) in January.


Wish you were here, subjective mood!

Quiz: how good is your American English?

How a timeline helps you plot a novel

Nouns that exist only in the plural or singular form

Editing the academic voice

Anaïs Nin on how reading awakens us from the slumber of almost-living

How do dogs understand words?

How comics are made

Copy edit tihs!

share on social media

Members’ blogs

What did this proofreader learn over the past 12 months? By Louise Harnby

No bullshit please by Sara Donaldson

How to make the switch to fiction editing by Sophie Playle (published by LibroEditing)

Crunching the numbers by Liz Jones

Monetising feedback and embracing fragility by Hazel Bird

Bookmarking for better editing by Richard Adin

Thinking fiction: what novels do fiction editors read? By Carolyn Healy (published by An American Editor)

Posted by Tracey Roberts, SfEP blog coordinator

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP

SfEP social media and blog round-up October 2016

In case you missed them, here are some of the most popular links and members’ blogs shared across the SfEP’s social media channels (Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn) in October.

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The history behind 8 Halloween words

Problem Clients, Part 4: How to Attract Your Ideal Clients

Slang: the changing face of cool

10 popular word origins that are absolute codswallop 

Infographic: the 69 rules of punctuation

What are the shortest words in English?

SfEP members’ blogs round-up

5 things to do before you send your book to a copy editor by Sara Donaldson

Being kind: coopetition versus competition by Liz Dexter

The business of editing: putting out the fire by Richard Adin

Not sure if you should hire a proofreader? Read these 4 quick tips now by Sarah Dronfield

Standing up for editing by Melanie Thompson

Author editing, authors’ editors and the perils of what to call ourselves by Kate Haigh

EPANI – who are we and what do we do? by Victoria Woodside

The perfect proofreader’s pen by Selena Class

Learning to write engaging dialogue by Mel Green

Carry on freelancing by Alexa Tewkesbury

A short dash to oblivion: 16 tips on hyphens and dashes by Howard Walwyn

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP

Social media round-up – June 2016

In case you missed them, here are some of the most popular links shared across the SfEP’s social media channels (Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn) in June.

share on social media

  1. Which words are people looking up post-Brexit? http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2016/06/word-trends-brexit/
  2. Digital publishing is now ‘fabric’, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy http://www.publishingtrainingcentre.co.uk/blogs/item/digital-publishing-is-now-fabric-but-that-doesn-t-mean-it-s-easy
  3. Shortcuts in editing (are they allowed?) http://cmosshoptalk.com/2016/06/07/shortcuts-in-editing-are-they-allowed/
  4. How well do you know football terminology? http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2016/06/football-terminology/
  5. How to work with publishers: 8 tips for freelancers https://bookmachine.org/2016/06/21/how-to-work-with-publishers-8-tips-for-freelancers/
  6. How to combine freelancing with teenagers. A (not) definitive guide http://workyourwords.co.uk/copywriter-blog/entry/how-to-combine-freelancing-with-teenagers-a-not-definitive-guide
  7. Stop. Using. Periods. Period. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/06/13/stop-using-periods-period-2/?tid=sm_tw
  8. What makes a bestseller? https://bookmachine.org/2016/06/09/what-makes-a-bestseller/
  9. But it’s nothing like the book! Why film adaptations rarely stay faithful http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/but-its-nothing-like-the-book-why-film-adaptations-rarely-stay-faithful-a7058271.html
  10. Could a movie about editing possibly be, well, genius? http://www.signature-reads.com/2016/06/could-a-movie-about-editing-possibly-be-well-genius/?platform=hootsuite

Posted by Tracey Roberts, SfEP blog coordinator

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP

May social media round-up – May 2016

share on social mediaIn case you missed them, here are some of the most popular links shared across the SfEP’s social media channels (Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn) in May.

  1. If a client complains that there are errors in the manuscript, how can an editor turn failure into success? https://www.copyediting.com/the-do-over-edit/
  2. Can I publish this photograph of the Mona Lisa? https://americaneditor.wordpress.com/2016/05/23/can-i-publish-this-photograph-of-the-mona-lisa/
  3. Are adult colouring-in books a recent fad? https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/may/21/17th-century-adult-colouring-in-book-albions-glorious-ile-michael-drayton-william-hole
  4. English Dialect Dictionary online https://stancarey.wordpress.com/2016/05/01/english-dialect-dictionary-online/
  5. Enid Blyton’s Famous Five spoof books to be published http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-36369366
  6. Printed book sales rise for first time in four years as ebooks decline http://www.theguardian.com/media/2016/may/13/printed-book-sales-ebooks-decline
  7. The editors role https://anthimeriarampant.wordpress.com/2016/05/03/the-editors-role/
  8. 5 reasons why a library is the best place to hide during a Zombie Apocalypse http://blog.oup.com/2016/05/library-hiding-zombie-apocalypse/
  9. How do you become an editor? https://nailyournovel.wordpress.com/2016/05/01/how-do-you-become-an-editor/
  10. A day in an editor’s brain http://www.stevelaube.com/day-editors-brain/

Posted by Tracey Roberts, SfEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.

Round-up of the ten most popular SfEP social media posts in February

SfEP logoSocial media moves very quickly, and the Society for Editors and Proofreaders (SfEP) Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn feeds are no different. So, to ensure you don’t miss out, here’s a summary of our ten most popular posts in February:

  1. 33 signs that were vandalised with the most hilarious responses ever. Pulptastic. (Posted on Facebook 20 February.)
  2. The wonderful names Chinese tourists have given British attractions. i100 from The Independent reported on the results of a campaign that asked people on China’s most popular social media sites to come up with names for 101 British attractions. (Posted on Facebook and Twitter 19 February.)
  3. Happy Friday – Is there a copy-editor on board? SfEP (Posted on Facebook 6 February.)
  4. Ten things people once complained would ruin the English language. From the io9 blog. (Posted on Facebook and Twitter 9 February.)
  5. Why reading and writing on paper can be better for your brain. The Guardian reports that reading from a hard copy improves concentration and that taking longhand notes rather typing onto laptops increases conceptual understanding and retention. (Posted on Facebook 25 February and Twitter 26 February.)
  6. 40 brilliant idioms that simply can’t be translated literally. Volunteers from the TED Open Translation Project share their favourite idioms from their mother tongue and how they translate literally. (Posted on Facebook 12 February and Twitter 13 February.)
  7. Editor confession: the things I hide from writers. A contributor to the copyediting.com blog admits to hiding some things from writers when editing their work. (Posted on Twitter 20 February.)
  8. When in Rome… read some place name idioms. The Oxford Dictionaries blog explores the reasons why some locations become proverbial. (Posted on Twitter 24 February.)
  9. Language and words in the news – 21 February. The Macmillan Dictionary blog shares a list of popular links related to language and words in the news. (Posted on Twitter 24 February.)
  10. Anybody can be a proofreader, can’t they? A link to the SfEP self-test in proofreading proved popular in February. (Posted on Twitter 9 February.)

Joanna BoweryJoanna Bowery is the SfEP social media manager. As well as looking after the SfEP’s Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn accounts and the SfEP blog, she offers freelance marketing, PR, writing and proofreading services as Cosmic Frog. Jo is an entry-level member of the SfEP and a Chartered Marketer. She is active on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+.

Proofread by SfEP entry-level member Anna Black.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.

A round-up of the ten most popular SfEP social media posts in December

SfEP logoSocial media moves very quickly, and the Society for Editors and Proofreaders (SfEP) Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn feeds are no different. To ensure you don’t miss out, here’s a summary of our ten most popular posts in December:

1. Seven words you need to stop capitalising, according to Danny Rubin, managing editor of the Huffington Post. (Posted on Facebook and Twitter 16 December.)

2. 51 of the most beautiful sentences in literature. Many of our Facebook followers were keen to add their own favourite literary sentences to this Buzzfeed list. (Posted on Facebook 11 December.)

3. Celtic and the history of the English language. Jonathon Owen on Arrant Pedantry points out that the origins of the English language are not always clear. (Posted on Facebook 2 December.)

4. Ebooks can tell which novels you didn’t finish. We wondered if any of the books on this list featured in the Guardian stand out as unfinishable, and if any in these lists surprised you? (Posted on Facebook 10 December.)

5. Gram marly texting speedTrue or False? Your texting speed is drastically slower than your friends’, because you insist on using standard spelling and grammar. Via Grammarly Cards. (Posted on Facebook 5 December.)

6. Tips on tact and tone. You may be an excellent editor, but how’s your bookside manner? Pat McNees provides some tips on tact and tone for copy-editors on the Writers and Editors blog. (Posted on Twitter 1 December.)

7. 15 ways to overcome procrastination and get stuff done. An infographic from entrepreneur.com. (Posted on Twitter 12 December.)

8. The continued decline of the homepage. According to Gerry McGovern’s New Thinking blog, every page should be a homepage for someone. (Posted on Twitter 3 December.)

9. Making good use of business down-time. This was also the topic of conversation on the SfEP forums recently. Ruth E. Thaler-Carter suggests a few ideas to ensure freelance editors make the most of any workflow lulls on the American Editor blog. (Posted on Twitter 1 December.)

10. Warm-glow proofreading. SfEP training director Stephen Cashmore got us all into the Christmas spirit of goodwill with a heart-warming tale of a time when he offered to proofread a book for nothing. (Posted on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn on 23 December.)

Joanna Bowery

Joanna Bowery is the SfEP social media manager. As well as looking after the SfEP’s Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn accounts and the SfEP blog, she offers freelance marketing, PR, writing and proofreading services. Jo is an associate of the SfEP and a Chartered Marketer. She is active on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+.

Proofread by SfEP associate Chris Charlton.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.

 

The 10 most-popular SfEP social media posts in November

SfEP logoSocial media moves very quickly, and the Society for Editors and Proofreaders (SfEP) Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn feeds are no different. So, to ensure you don’t miss out, here’s a summary of our ten most popular posts in November.

OverSixty – amazing tips and tricks for using Google. Ten tips and tricks to help you master the Google search engine. Useful at any age. While you probably know some of these hacks, even we didn’t know them all. (Posted on Facebook 19 November.)

4 myths about editors. From know-it-alls with red pens to people who make no mistakes, myths about editors abound – but what are editors really like? This post busts some of the myths. (Posted on Twitter 7 November and Facebook 10 November.)

Why typos and spelling mistakes don’t really matter. An article from the BBC that is sure to raise the hackles of any editor or proofreader. (Posted on Facebook 3 November.)

A Twitter post from @davidjayharris. “Not sure how this made it through proofreading, peer review, and copyediting. Via the Wiley Online Library.” An embarrassing slip-up exposed via Twitter. (Posted on Facebook 12 November.)

11 idioms only Brits understand. There was some discussion on our Facebook page about how ‘British’ the examples in this blog actually are. (Posted on Facebook 18 November.)

Britain’s silliest place names. From Bottom Burn to Nethergong, a new map highlights the silliest towns and villages in Britain. For those times when you have to triple-check if there really is a place called … (Posted on Facebook 21 November.)

Twelve-step editing. For when the line between structural editing and copy-editing is blurred. (Posted on Twitter 10 November.)

5 social media sites you should be using. Recommended social media sites for editors and proofreaders. (Posted on Twitter 3 November.)

Beating workaholism. An insightful article about how workaholism, rather than procrastination, is the biggest issue homeworkers face. (Posted on Twitter 11 November.)

Go away spelling reform, you’re not needed here. Part three of Sue Littleford’s series of blogs for the SfEP on how the internet has contributed to the democratisation of English. (Posted on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook 4 November.)

Joanna Bowery

Joanna Bowery is the SfEP social media manager. As well as looking after the SfEP’s Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn accounts and the SfEP blog, she offers freelance marketing, PR, writing and proofreading services operating as Cosmic Frog. Jo is an associate of the SfEP and a Chartered Marketer. She is active on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+.

This article was proofread by SfEP associate Thomas Hawking.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.