Category Archives: Events

What’s on near you? Information about the many SfEP events, local group meets and training courses.

My first mini-conference: Toronto 2019

By Cat London

Reentering the professional world after being in the trenches as the primary caregiver to young children for eight and a half years is a bit like coming out of a cinema after a daytime movie: you emerge, blinking, surprised to find that the sun is shining and the parking lot is full of cars. Well, the analogy may not be perfect, but as my youngest child approaches three, returning to in-person professional development and finding new opportunities to meet and learn from my colleagues after being focused on my work and my kids has been a pleasure I had not anticipated.

Having recently joined the SfEP, I decided to attend the Toronto mini-conference and so I took a train to my onetime hometown of Toronto. I wasn’t able to attend the pre-conference workshop, led by Dr Malini Devadas, a neuroscientist, editor and coach, but I was fortunate to get an abridged version via Cloud Club a couple of days earlier. Malini, having just arrived from Australia, took the time to answer questions about changing your mindset to increase your income, and to talk about confidence, rates, efficiency and marketing. Her thoughts were very useful to me as I have been starting to think about what my business will look like going forward when my son begins at school.

I have been editing from home in yoga pants for so long that I was quite nervous about being in a room full of talented colleagues and learning from such luminaries as Paul Beverley and Jennifer Glossop. I wasn’t 100% sure I remembered how to talk to actual grownups face to face. However, the organisers and volunteers were so kind and welcoming, the space so full of natural light and the attendees’ conversation so interesting that I quickly felt at ease and excited for the day.

Paul Beverley, the famed Word Macro Man, had flown from the UK to talk to the group about Word macros. He demonstrated some of the huge array of tools he has created and gives away at no charge, with instructions on how to put them to best use. I use a couple of macros regularly, but during Paul’s session I was reminded of how much time I can save every day by mastering macros at a greater depth. I have thus far ignored his DocAlyse and other analysis macros, but have now realised how badly I need them! I also hadn’t realised that there’s a macro that can change the screen background colour according to whether Track Changes is on or off. If you’ve ever had to redo work because you hadn’t tracked the changes (hand up!) you’ll realise how exciting this is. During the break, Paul took the time to look at a macro I had been having trouble with, and even emailed me the next day with follow-up suggestions. Janet MacMillan, one of the organisers of the mini-conference, had mentioned to me several times how kind and giving the general culture of the SfEP is, and Paul is the perfect case in point.

After Paul, we heard from Jennifer Glossop, a Canadian fiction editor I hold in esteem bordering on awe. Jennifer has been working in publishing for over four decades and has edited such authors as Margaret Atwood, David Suzuki and Tim Wynne-Jones. Books she has edited have won or been nominated for many awards, including the Governor General’s Award and the Giller. Jennifer talked about ‘finding the missing parts in a narrative’, about how cutting what is too long is sometimes a simpler task than knowing what is not there and how to put it in. We talked about how to find what might be missing in the areas of plot, character and senses, including missing or offstage scenes, missing emotions, and gaps in timelines. I could write a whole blog post on Jennifer’s thoughts on consequences and how they can work forward and backward in a book (a scene can have consequences down the road or be caused by something that has already happened); the conversation gave me new tools for how to handle some of the challenges I have met in books I have edited, and new ways to explain some of these ideas to authors.

Erin Brenner, an editor from the US with more than 20 years’ experience, titled her session ‘Copyediting 2.0: Editing in the Age of “Post It Now or Lose Your Audience”’, and her talk left me wincing. Not because it wasn’t excellent – it was – but because she helped me realise how many tools and tasks I’ve been ignoring because I’ve been ‘too busy to work smarter’. Erin talked about how easy it is to procrastinate or disregard important tasks like reviewing style guides and finding ways to speed up your work using tools such as PhraseExpander, shortcuts and even the simple yet noble sticky note, as well as how to triage when you don’t have enough time to do everything you would like to do to a document.

Heather Ebbs, a Canadian indexer, writer, editor and teacher, gave me insight into something I knew almost nothing about: indexes. As she put it, ‘indexes are about aboutness’ and it was fascinating to learn more about how indexers work and how to do a better job when tasked with editing an index. When the session ended, I felt a profound sense of certainty that I could never be an indexer, and a more profound sense of gratitude for the professionals who have the skills and experience to do this job with expertise.

Amy Schneider, an editor who has worked on all kinds of books and other projects since 1995, came from the US as well. Her talk, about customising your workspace with templates, dovetailed with Erin’s and reminded me once again that there are many ways to work an awful lot smarter instead of harder, and that it’s time to plunge into them. Amy showed how she uses templates for her work – changing documents to screen-optimised fonts and ensuring that different styles stand out so they can be better edited more quickly – but more importantly she showed us how to take that information and apply it to just about any project and work style.

The sessions ended with a Q&A with all the speakers. The theme that emerged from the day was clearly how to work smarter and more efficiently. Erin challenged us all to do better when it comes to efficiency, and I’m told Malini’s workshop the previous day challenged attendees to pick one thing and do it. So, here I am, publicly pledging that I will be setting up the DocAlyse macro and getting to know it (and maybe HyphenAlyse and ProperNounAlyse) this week.

The conference organisers were like ninjas, or perhaps wizards, conjuring trays of fresh food and pots of hot coffee into convenient locations at regular intervals. Each aspect of delegate attendance was handled thoughtfully, from pronoun stickers to a policy for immunocompromised attendees, to ensure that everyone felt comfortable. There were opportunities to get tech help from Paul Beverley and to learn more about Queen’s University Professional Studies from talented editor Corina Koch MacLeod, who is an educational designer with Queen’s. I don’t want to write an uncritical review, so I’ve been trying hard to come up with something negative to say about the day. I suppose next year it would be nice if organisers could arrange for the weather to be a bit warmer. After the conference we retired to a pub across the street, from which I was sorry to have to dash for the train.

I’m grateful to the organising team of Maya Berger, Kelly Lamb, Janet MacMillan and Rachel Small for bringing together such a welcoming, international group of supportive, interesting and generally lovely people for a day of learning. It was the perfect way to return to in-person professional development, and no one asked me for a snack or told me that their brother was hitting them. I hope to be able to attend some of the SfEP Toronto group meetings in the future, and I am looking forward to next year’s mini-conference.

Cat London recently joined the SfEP as a Provisional Advanced Professional Member. She does developmental editing, copyediting and proofreading of fiction and non-fiction, primarily for publishing companies, and also works as a photographer. A certified copyeditor through Editors Canada, Cat has edited a great deal of gritty fiction and maintains an extensive library of style sheets cataloguing various slang, expletives and obscenities. She lives in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, with her husband, dog and altogether too many children.


Coming up in 2020:

  • The SfEP’s local groups will meet regularly throughout 2020 have a look at the calendar.
  • The next annual SfEP conference will be at Kents Park Hill, Milton Keynes, 1214 September 2020 booking will open in spring 2020.

Photo credits: SfEP notebook – Cat London; Toronto skyline – Richard Kidger on Unsplash.

Proofread by Victoria Hunt, Intermediate Member.
Posted by Abi Saffrey, SfEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.

 

 

 

 

 

Learn and be inspired: Toronto mini-conference 2019

By Christine Stock

It’s autumn, and with the changing leaves and cooler temperatures, minds return to more work-related things, not least of all training and continuing professional development. Hot on the trail of the successful Society for Editors and Proofreaders (SfEP) Birmingham conference is the Toronto SfEP group’s second mini-conference; a conference international in content, speakers and delegates, on Wednesday 6 November. Jam-packed with international editing superstars, including both speakers and delegates – it’s not one to miss.

New to the schedule this year is a pre-conference workshop to be held on Tuesday 5 November. Dr Malini Devadas (Australia) holds a PhD in neuroscience but loves working with words more than working in a lab. An editor since 2004, Malini has spent a number of years studying marketing and the role mindset plays in gaining clients. Her workshop is ideal for any editor who wants more income, more clients, or both.

Whether you want to gain new skills or simply re-energise, this year’s one-day conference is for you. Leading off the day is the UK’s Paul Beverley (fondly known as Macro Man due to his impressive collection of more than 650 macros). Paul’s ‘marvellous macros’ will save us time and energy, not to mention make us look good. Paul’s tips, which he shares generously and with precise instruction, will provide delegates with a set of tools they can use immediately.

Next up is the renowned Jennifer Glossop (Canada). Jennifer’s impressive editing portfolio includes books that have won the Governor General’s Award and the Crime Writers of Canada Award, as well as those nominated for the Giller Prize and the Books in Canada First Novel Award. With more than 40 years’ experience in publishing, and with an extensive client list that includes Margaret Atwood and David Suzuki, her session on ‘finding the missing parts in a narrative’ is certain to assist both fiction and non-fiction editors alike, whether they are experienced or less experienced.

The afternoon’s presentations will be equally engaging and informative. Erin Brenner (US) will begin the sessions with a discussion on editing efficiently, a goal I’m certain we all have. Erin has been in the publishing industry for more than two decades and has published hundreds of articles and blog posts on writing and editing. Her experience as a writing trainer for communications specialists and her reputation as a highly skilled editor with top-notch professionalism will make her session a game-changer for those wanting time management and other efficiency advice.

Following Erin is Heather Ebbs (Canada), an indexer, writer and editor for nearly 40 years. Heather’s experience as a writer of hundreds of indexes covering a broad range of subjects and styles, as well as her role as instructor (since 2009) of Indexing: Theory and Application at the University of California Berkeley Extension Program, make her the ideal presenter for a session on all things indexing. Heather’s highly anticipated presentation will benefit both editors and indexers (and those who are interested in expanding into indexing).

Next is Amy Schneider (US), a freelance copyeditor and proofreader since 1995. Amy’s vast experience includes working on college textbooks, trade non-fiction, university press books and fiction in a variety of genres. An experienced presenter on editorial topics for numerous associations, including the Editorial Freelancers Association and ACES: The Society for Editing, Amy’s session on customising your workspace with templates promises to be chock-full of helpful takeaways.

My anticipation for the November activities is bolstered by fond memories of the Toronto SfEP group’s first mini-conference, which was held in 2018 and was equally international. I arrived at the beautiful venue eager to learn from the star-studded roster of speakers and left with ideas, tips and knowledge I just couldn’t wait to try out. Additionally, I shared insights, commiserated and joked with quickly made friends and colleagues. I had found my professional family.

This year’s conference and workshop, with the line-up of presenters, spread of delicious food and celebration of the SfEP’s recent chartership announcement, are bound to be a great success. If you’re looking for a reason to hone your skills, learn new tips, find a friendly, inclusive-minded and supportive group of editorial professionals, the conference and the workshop are for you. Presented by co-organisers Maya Berger, Kelly Lamb, Janet MacMillan and Rachel Small, it will be a day to be remembered and celebrated as wordsmiths unite. On behalf of the organisers and the rest of the local Toronto SfEP group, we hope to see you there.


Register for the Toronto mini-conference now!


Christine Stock is a Professional Member of the SfEP. She enjoys hot beverages on cold days and adores all things words and travel. Her editing specialities include fiction and creative non-fiction, and, in 2016, she was nominated for the Rosemary Shipton Award for Excellence in Book Editing provided by Ryerson University (Toronto). She can frequently be found at the corner coffee shop or at the monthly Toronto SfEP meetings.

 


Proofread by Alice McBrearty, Entry-Level Member.
Posted by Abi Saffrey, SfEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.

Photo credits: Toronto sign at night Maarten van den Heuvel on Unsplash; Passion led us here – Ian Schneider on Unsplash.

Our SfEP local group – the first decade: ten years, ten observations

By Helen Stevens

In March 2009, on a whim, I contacted a local proofreader I’d come across when nosing around on Yell.com. We met for coffee and chatted about the possibility of starting a local SfEP group, and a couple of months later the first meeting of the West/North Yorkshire SfEP local group took place. Around 20 people came along – an amazing number for an initial gathering!

Having met every three months over the intervening years, in June 2019 we held our 41st local group meeting. Our theme for the meeting was onscreen mark-up (Google Docs, PDFs and Word Track Changes) – not a particularly celebratory topic, perhaps. But a couple of weeks later we got together for an unofficial tenth anniversary social event, enjoying a traditional Yorkshire curry and some more relaxed conversation.

Here are ten things I’ve learned from running the West/North Yorkshire SfEP local group for ten years.

1. There’s always something to talk about

I don’t particularly enjoy face-to-face networking, and I’m no fan of small talk, but when you’re among editors and proofreaders that doesn’t seem to be a problem. Whether you’re a complete newbie or an old hand, you can always chat about training, different types of editing and proofreading work, business issues (particularly if you’re a freelancer), previous work experience, etc. And most people are also happy to answer your questions about such topics, which can add another dimension to your own research in books or on websites.

2. I *can* organise an event

Several years ago I helped to organise a couple of major local events for a client, and I vowed never to do it again (too stressful!). Our local group meetings are kept deliberately low-key, but still require me to book a room at a suitable venue (see below), send out invitations, make sure we have a theme, keep a check on the numbers attending, liaise with the venue and ‘chair’ the meeting. There’s also a little bit of background admin: adding people to my email list and removing them as appropriate (in line with GDPR), notifying the SfEP community director of the date/time of our meetings and so on. This is all well within my comfort zone – and it seems to have worked so far.

3. The venue can be the biggest headache

I’m not talking about the helpfulness of the staff, the quality of the coffee or the hardness of the chairs – although they are significant factors. More importantly, the venue needs to be reasonably accessible (in terms of both transport links and individual mobility), cheap or free to use and of a suitable size for the number of people attending. The acoustics of the place can also be an issue if you’re hoping to have any sort of group discussion.

Our first meeting was in the lovely diner at Salts Mill (very noisy). We’ve since met at a nearby local café (we stopped meeting there when they suddenly wanted a booking deposit), upstairs at a couple of other cafés (one closed down, one could no longer accommodate a large group) and now in a smaller café in Salts Mill that’s reserved for our meeting. I’m not sure there’s such a thing as a perfect venue – the trick is to find one that ticks as many boxes as possible.

4. There isn’t a time/day that will suit everyone

I have to hold my hand up and say that when I started the group, I chose a time (and, indeed, a location) that suited me, but I recognise that our meeting times won’t suit everyone. We’ve always met during the day, and of course some people who’d like to attend simply aren’t available then. Holding evening meetings would be an option, but that wouldn’t suit everyone either (and would mean finding a new venue – see above!). We do at least vary the days of our meetings, as some members of the group have firm commitments (work or otherwise) that mean they can’t come on particular days. But the search for that elusive ‘perfect time’ continues…

5. Something with a theme works best

For the first couple of years our meetings were simply a chance for general (professional/social) chat, and that seemed to work fine. When we moved our meetings to a room upstairs in a local café, we had the opportunity for more focused discussions, and I think that has worked well. New people have a chance to find out about a specific topic, and it gives more experienced editors and proofreaders more of a reason to come to the meeting and share their experience (and, indeed, learn something new). It can be a challenge to find themes that appeal to such a wide range of people. Several group members have led sessions: we’ve had talks on public speaking training, proofreading annual reports, and editing from a fiction author’s point of view, as well as a very successful session on grammar, spelling and punctuation niggles. And we usually end the year with an ‘editorial highs and lows’ session in December: most people have had a high or low of some kind, whatever their level of experience.

6. People will come and go

The people who come along to our meetings are a constantly changing group. Yes, there are those who’ve been attending regularly for years (and some of these even came to that very first gathering). But we also have people who have been to one or two meetings and then (for whatever reason) didn’t come again, as well as those who’ve attended regularly until they retired, moved away from the area or decided on a different career path. This ever-changing membership helps to keep our meetings fresh, while still allowing participants to get to know a few familiar faces.

7. People will travel great distances for meetings

I chose Saltaire for our meetings because it’s reasonably well served by public transport and road links (as well as being a lovely place that’s right on my doorstep). But I’ve been really surprised over the years at the distances people are willing to travel to come to our group. From the earliest days we had a couple of members who came all the way from the wilds of the Yorkshire Dales, and we regularly have participants from Leeds, Wakefield, Doncaster, Huddersfield, Hull – and even darkest Lancashire! At the other end of the spectrum, and from a personal point of view, it’s also been great for me to get to know editors and proofreaders who live within a mile or two of me.

8. People are very different

Anyone who’s spent any time at all around editors and proofreaders will realise that there’s no such thing as ‘typical’. Our group welcomes those who are just considering a career in editing or proofreading, those who’ve started their training, those who’ve been working in the profession for a while and those who might be termed ‘veterans’. Some of them work on fiction, some specialise in legal, corporate, scientific or academic fields, and some do a little bit of everything! Although it’s sometimes a challenge to cater for all these disparate interests, I definitely think our meetings benefit from this mix.

9. We all learn from each other

Linked to the previous point, I think we all have a lot to learn from each other, whatever our level of experience or area of interest. Someone who’s new to the profession might have a deep knowledge of the different training options available. In-house staff will have different perspectives from those who work as freelancers. And we can definitely all learn from each other when it comes to the technical side of our work, whether that’s software tools to help with the job, social media platforms for marketing our services, different methods of getting paid or tax requirements for sole traders.

10. Local groups are vital for the SfEP

A thriving local group is a great way in to the SfEP. The discussions we have at our meetings aren’t designed to promote the Society explicitly, but I do think being part of a local group gives people a sense of what the SfEP is about: mutual support, learning, sharing ideas and experience and meeting like-minded others. From the Society’s point of view, getting people involved in local groups can be great for member recruitment and retention. For example, two people who’ve been involved in the West/North Yorkshire group now run other local groups, strengthening their personal engagement with the SfEP. Such engagement can feed through to regional mini-conferences and to the main SfEP conference: it’s so much nicer to attend an event if you know there are going to be at least a few familiar faces.

I’ve learned a lot during the SfEP West/North Yorkshire local group’s first ten years. It was lovely to mark the occasion with a relaxed social event, and I’m looking forward to the next ten years (if only because it’ll be an excuse for another curry).

Helen Stevens has been a freelance proofreader, editor and copywriter for over 20 years, and now specialises in academic and non-fiction editing. She enjoys walking, reading, and playing Scrabble and mahjong, though not all at the same time.

 


There are SfEP local groups all over the UK – as well as in Toronto, Canada. There is also an international Cloud Club for those unable to attend meetings in person.


Proofread by Victoria Hunt, Intermediate Member.
Posted by Abi Saffrey, SfEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.


 

Wise owls: the best thing about the SfEP conference

It’s SfEP conference week, and attendees are starting to get excited and/or nervous! The wise owls are here to let first timers know what they’ve got to look forward to, and to remind old hands why they keep going back.

Melanie ThompsonMelanie Thompson

What’s the best thing about the SfEP conference? I didn’t need to spend any time at all thinking how to answer that question: it’s the people!

I’ve been to many other work-related conferences, and none are so friendly or welcoming. The first conference I attended was in Edinburgh (in the early 2000s). A meal was arranged for the first evening, and a Council member said hello and introduced me to some other people and I haven’t looked back. I still chat regularly to some of those I met on that first evening and, as I often say in answer to similar questions, I wouldn’t have been able to stay freelance for almost 20 years without the supportive and helpful people in this Society. You’re all bloomin’ marvellous!

Oh, and the opportunity to take part in concentrated, high-quality CPD is, of course, very valuable.

Sue LittlefordSue Littleford

The absolute best thing about the SfEP conference is getting outside your own work bubble. Quite aside from the risk of isolation for those who work freelance from home, for those of us who have never worked in-house (and we are legion), it’s easy to develop your own ways of doing things, not really knowing how you compare on the standard of your work itself and what is best (or at least better) practice in how you handle your clients and approach your workload. If you’re in-house, but have had only one publisher employer, it’s so easy to believe that their way is the only way, or certainly the best way, of working. The conference gives you the chance to go to sessions that will enhance your appreciation of your position within Editor Land – and even if all you get from a particular workshop is validation of your own routine (comforting and confidence-building as that is), then a comment your neighbour makes during an exercise, or a question someone raises, or answers, may be like a lightning bolt. That’s happened to me several times, to my immediate benefit (and that of my clients).

And once you’ve been to enough conferences that you’ve covered all the core skills from several angles, there’s always more. Go to a session that you normally wouldn’t think of (to my regret, I keep missing the bookbinding events. One day … !) or one of the panel discussions and step into the wider editorial world.

Liz Jones

Yes, there’s the CPD aspect, the cooked breakfast, the lockable door on a room of one’s own, the challenging campus map, the possibilities for fruitful networking. But the best thing of all about the SfEP conference – and I say this as a confirmed introvert who is easily exhausted by too much time in the company of others – is the people. Forty-eight whole hours among kindred spirits: collectively some of the most welcoming, humble, skilled, interesting, humorous and supportive people I’ve ever encountered. I’ve been attending the conference since 2013, with one year off, and it’s one of the highlights of my year. I talk (and listen) enough during those two days to last me for the remaining 12 months, and it makes me very happy.

Louise BolotinLouise Bolotin

Is there anything that is not a best thing about the conference? That’s not a rhetorical question – there is so much that is good, nay brilliant, about our annual gathering that it’s hard to decide what deserves the title of ‘best’. The workshops and seminars are invariably informative, useful and enlightening. Sometimes even career-changing. Last year, my big takeaway was the decision to do the SfEP course on medical editing after attending Julia Slone-Murphy’s introductory workshop. I’d been toying with a move into this kind of editing for a while, and the workshop confirmed I should do so. A year later, I’ve yet to sign up for training – I’ve been too busy with work and a family crisis – but I’ve earmarked time for this autumn to get started. I also found the workshop on growing your business packed with simple and free ideas that I’d never even thought of before, let alone considered. It is these kinds of sessions that are a major attraction for me – the chance to learn something new and apply it to how I earn my living.

Then there’s the lectures – as entertaining as they are educational. The opportunity to hear experts on the future of our industry, or expounding on some language issue or other, is something all delegates should get out of bed for in time! Last year’s lecture on US v UK English by Lynne Murphy was a classic – buttock-clenchingly hilarious, but also with serious points to make on the nuances of editing. (Ditto the mini lecture on dealing with the sweary stuff – which was educative, informative and a full-on side splitter.)

In the end, it’s the people who make it what it is. The chance to put names to forum avatars, catch up and have a good gossip with long-standing colleagues, meet the directors, and basically just hang out. The conference is work, but it’s also a break from work and hanging out with other editors really is one of the best bits. Just don’t do what I did and rush up to someone you’ve been dying to meet for a decade just as they’re entering a toilet cubicle …

Hazel BirdHazel Bird

For me, the best thing about the SfEP conference is its ability to shake me out of my tree. Don’t get me wrong, I peer out from between the branches regularly by attending local groups, following editorial discussions online, and generally expanding my awareness of editorial techniques and perspectives. However, at the SfEP conference, the sheer volume of information that you get – and the unexpected, serendipitous, surprising nature of it all – is unbeatable.

I’ve been to five conferences in the past and have returned from each one re-energised and refocused. Sometimes the snippets I’ve picked up are more directly editorially relevant and sometimes the link is more tangential. For example, at the 2017 conference I was finally persuaded to try TextExpander, which has sped up the repetitive aspects of my communications with authors considerably. However, at the same conference, Julia Sandford-Cooke mentioned the podcast How I Built This, which is a series of interviews with world-famous entrepreneurs. The scale and nature of their ventures are a million miles away from mine, but the show has become one of my staples for its ability to make me think about how I run my business and relate to my clients. Other times at conferences, sessions have simply boosted my confidence in a skill I already had or given me a shot of enthusiasm to try something new.

I thoroughly recommend the SfEP conference for its ability to support us all in being informed, educated and enthusiastic editorial professionals.


This year’s SfEP conference runs from 14 to 16 September, at Aston University, Birmingham. Follow what’s happening on Twitter (and other social media platforms): the hashtag is #sfep2019


Proofread by Alice McBrearty, Entry-Level Member.
Posted by Abi Saffrey, SfEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.

 

‘Pedantry is not a good look’: the radical message of English Grammar Day

By Julia Sandford-Cooke

So, when I told another SfEP member that I was going to English Grammar Day at the British Library, he was like, ‘I hope it doesn’t just involve complaining about Americanisms and overworked shop assistants writing “Out off order” signs’. Well, I was kind of expecting it would be just that – but, you know, it actually turned out to be kind of a subversive celebration of language change. And, yes, it also acknowledged the numerous linguistic tics I’ve already used in this opening paragraph. I suspect that prescriptively inclined delegates went home despairing of the deteriorating state of the English language. But, if they did, they weren’t paying attention.

Editors tend to be descriptive, not prescriptive, in their approach

For me, the day raised the issue of how we, as editors, can balance the prescriptive and descriptive elements of language use. It’s all very well for academics to shrug their shoulders and agree that things change, but where do we stand when our job is to ensure that text in the public domain is correct?

Or is that our job? Perhaps we should regard our work more as facilitating communication. Most modern editors would probably agree that it is. SfEP members formed a good proportion of the audience and I didn’t hear any of them grinding their teeth (except when it was suggested that nobody would miss the possessive apostrophe). In fact, most of us nodded at Rob Drummond’s graph indicating that pedantry decreases as language knowledge increases.

When people criticise the language of others, it’s almost always about more than language

Take Zwicky’s bias warnings, quoted by David Denison:

  • The recency illusion – a belief that things you notice recently are recent.
  • The frequency illusion – once you’ve noticed something, you see it everywhere but that doesn’t mean it happens all the time.

We all have our tics and bugbears. I hate constructions like ‘We were sat on the bench’ and ‘Come with’ (it’s ‘come with ME’, dammit!) and would correct these in written text without a second thought. On the other hand, I am aware that all my conversations are peppered with the oft-despised ‘like’. As Rob Drummond said in his talk, ‘standard’ English is an arbitrary accident of history, reflecting the balance of power and personal choices that may, or may not, have gained wider traction. The speech of those who decry ‘like’ or the exclamatory ‘so’ almost certainly features other discourse markers that nobody seems to mind – ‘kind of’, ‘well’, ‘you know’, ‘I mean’, ‘actually’. Your ‘overuse’ of linguistic tics may be someone else’s normal. They’re not necessarily devoid of meaning, either – it was pointed out that certain academics’ use of ‘as it were’ could imply that the speaker feels that ordinary words are not adequate to express the brilliance of their insight!

There is evidently a difference between what people say and what people think they said, and, frankly white, middle-aged, middle-class men – those with the power – receive less linguistic criticism than other groups in society. Everyone has preferences but when these become judgements and prejudices, these preferences are problematic. The use of ‘he’ as a singular generic pronoun has, thankfully, fallen out of favour but the lack of an alternative term raises new issues. Charlotte Brewer analysed actor James Woods’ recent tweet complaining about the singular ‘they’, taken by many to be transphobic. Dictionaries tend to avoid the matter, as well as failing to reflect new definitions of other gendered words – ‘husband’ and ‘wife’, for example. Do dictionaries record or sanction use – or neither? A woman may have a wife, whether or not the dictionary says it’s possible.

Non-standard may become standard but, even if it doesn’t, non-standard does not mean sub-standard. In fact, it often does a better job of communicating than standard forms. A good example is the sophistication and eloquence of much grime music and rap. Check out The Hip-hop Shakespeare Company for more evidence.

To misquote Taylor Swift: ‘Hey, kids! Grammar is fun!’

Grammar is often taught in primary schools by those who are not confident in describing the technical details. To be honest, many editors make a good living without knowing what a modal verb is, or caring about the difference between ‘which is better?’ and ‘which is best?’. Does it matter? Probably not, if the aim is to pass Key Stage SATs or to make a passage of text easier to understand. But English Grammar Day showed that grammar is about much more than whether fronted adverbials improve a piece of prose.

Editors normally work with the written word. Most users of English differentiate between writing and speaking modes, but younger people often blend the two. Electronic forms of communication (texting, for example) may reflect spoken language written down, but we don’t yet have the terminology to grammatically assess it.

There is always an element of choice in how we use language. Non-standard grammar can both reflect, and play a role in, the performance and expression of our identities. Code-switching is not a problem for most speakers if they first recognise the need and then choose to do so. Contrary to rumour, there is apparently no evidence that GCSE and A-Level examiners have come across text-speak – clearly, young people know how to meet the standards appropriate to the situation. The theme of our 2017 SfEP conference was ‘context is key’ – nobody is saying that students shouldn’t use standard grammar in formal essays, but they don’t need to use it in everyday writing and speech, as long as their audience understands them.

Which brings us back to how editors could address these issues. There’s one short answer. Rob Drummond added a coda to his graph that, ‘You can become a pedantic anti-pedant and that’s unattractive as well.’ Our job, as those with the language knowledge, is to educate pedants. And, sometimes, our job is to recognise that we are those same pedants.

With thanks to the day’s speakers, who provided the springboard for my thoughts in this blog post and to whom I apologise for any inadvertent plagiarism: Charlotte Brewer, Jon Hutchinson, David Denison, Ingrid Tieken-Boon van Ostade, Barbara Bleiman, Rob Drummond and John Mullan.

And with apologies to my proofreader for the first few sentences.

Julia Sandford-CookeJulia Sandford-Cooke of WordFire Communications has 20 years’ experience of publishing and marketing. She has written and edited numerous textbooks, specialising in vocational education, media studies, construction, health and safety, and travel. Check out her micro book reviews on Ju’s Reviews. Don’t ask her to explain what a modal verb is.

 


You can brush up your grammar with the SfEP’s online course.


Proofread by Joanne Heath, Entry-Level Member.
Posted by Abi Saffrey, SfEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.

National Freelancers Day 2019

By Abi Saffrey

Over the past five years, IPSE has hosted the ever-expanding National Freelancers Day. A friend joined the IPSE board last year and it prompted me to find out more, and I then bought an early bird ticket to this year’s event (for all of £20). The event was packed with sessions sorted into four streams: Winning Work, Digital, Health & Wellbeing and Finance. The day started with a keynote speech by Pip Jamieson, founder of The Dots, a diverse community of ‘no collar professionals’. No collar professionals are freelancers, or job hoppers, with generally creative-led skills, motivated by purpose. The Dots allows those people to detail projects they have worked on, and credit other contributors – a shift away from the linear career approach of CVs and LinkedIn. The key points I took away from those 45 minutes with Pip were:

  • Free is not always a dirty word.
  • Think laterally: tech and digital pay.
  • You are as good as the networks you build.
  • Work hard and be nice to people: use interpersonal skills and have human relationships.
  • You are the average of the five people you hang out with the most.

Winning work

Following Pip’s keynote, I concentrated on sessions in the Winning Work stream, including one on collaborative working by Hela Wozniak-Kay (share your knowledge, charge for your expertise), a panel discussion with five young entrepreneurs about how to succeed as a freelancer, Erica Wolfe-Murray’s flash talk on understanding your difference (made even faster by the previous speaker overrunning by 10 minutes – each flash talk was due to be 15 minutes long) and Carl Reader’s full-on Q&A session about ‘Building brand YOU’. The key themes in these sessions were:

  • social media, in particular Instagram, and the importance of engaging with followers and commenters
  • coworking spaces, great for networking
  • people do business with people – human to human
  • passion for what you do and how you do it.

Wear clothes

The day finished with another keynote speaker, this time Adam Kay, author of This is Going to Hurt. Adam talked (and made us laugh) about his shift from junior doctor to freelance writer and comedian, and offered his key advice for freelancers:

  • Wear clothes.
  • Wear shoes.
  • Food is fuel, not a distraction.
  • Don’t work on a sofa.
  • Say ‘no’.
  • Do things you’re passionate about even if it doesn’t make you money.

As well as over 20 presentations, workshops and panel discussions, there were also opportunities to talk to companies specialising in insurance, mortgages and bank accounts for freelancers – and to get a free headshot from The Headshot Guy or be drawn by Emmeline Pidgen. I got the photo (see my bio below), but was too slow to sign up for an exclusive original portrait.

Being the only editor

It was a different experience to a publishing or editing networking and professional development event: the sheer number of people meant fewer in-depth conversations, the variety of skills and industries meant a different range of ‘in jokes’, and some of the sessions I attended were city-centric (with limited awareness of how working life in rural areas or small towns is different). The goody bag wasn’t overflowing with pens but did include a fish-eye lens to clip over my phone’s camera lens (which of course will now be used for all photos until I sit on/drop/let the children near it).

I spent most of the day out of my comfort zone, but encountered inspiring people and came home with some ideas about refreshing my business and some ideas about what I don’t want to do. I will go again next year, with an updated elevator pitch and a shorter description on my name badge.

Abi Saffrey is an editorial project manager, copy-editor, proofreader, cat minion, tea drinker, Advanced Professional Member of the SfEP, sunflower grower and walker. She is author of the recently published Editorial Project Management guide and co-author of the SfEP’s Editorial Project Management course. Connect with her on LinkedIn; you can follow her on Twitter too but be prepared for cat pictures and ranting.

 


Proofread by Emma Easy, Entry-Level Member.
Posted by Abi Saffrey, SfEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.

The SfEP mini-conference: the Newcastle edition

By Annie Deakins

When I heard that the North East Editors were organising a one-day SfEP mini-conference in Newcastle, I was very tempted. The train journey from Essex would be relatively easy, with an overnight stay at the Holiday Inn. On the morning of the conference, I headed to the venue – the stunning Royal Station Hotel – adjacent to the railway station. Victoria Suite was sumptuous and spacious for the 68 delegates.

An interesting variety of sessions had been planned. They were:

  1. Marketing your editing business, with Denise Cowle
  2. The changing world of academic publishing, with Matt Deacon (from Wearset)
  3. Ministry of (Business) Training (MO(B)T), with Melissa Middleton
  4. Efficient editing – how to make the most of your fee, with Hester Higton
  5. Panel discussion: Navigating a course in publishing, chaired by Luke Finley, with Sarah Wray, Debbie Taylor, Alex Niven.

Eleanor Abraham (@EBAeditorial) wrote excellent summaries in her live tweeting throughout all the sessions. I have relied on some of her tweets for accuracy.

Marketing your editing business

Denise is the SfEP marketing director and she belongs to the Content Marketing Academy. Some of her points included:

  • It’s important to make the shift from ‘freelance’ to ‘business owner’.
  • Have a website. Your website is yours to do with what you want.
  • Be brave and network with colleagues.
  • Like, comment and share content from colleagues.
  • Be helpful and demonstrate your knowledge.
  • Add value. Give away brilliant free stuff on your website (be like Louise Harnby, the room chorused!).

Time for coffee and CAKE!

The changing world of academic publishing

Next, Matt Deacon, the project manager at Wearset (one of the conference sponsors), talked about the pressures that publishers are against. Pressures from profit-driven markets, the internet, expectations on speed of delivery, globalisation and increased competition. He asked if artificial intelligence is going to take our jobs. No. Context, style and subtlety of language need the human element. Automation tools (such as PerfectIt) can carry out mundane tasks and reduce the time taken to edit, leaving us to focus on language and sense. Matt suggested how to future-proof editing: spot change, embrace and innovate, and spearhead development. Another thought was, how can we as editors encourage standardisation of templates among publishers? He suggested that the SfEP has a role to play in encouraging cleaner formats for editing by sharing discussions between publisher and author clients.

Ministry of (Business) Training

The third session, with Melissa Middleton, was lively. She runs Project North East, promoting enterprise. In groups, we listed all the ways we do daily CPD … what? It turns out we do quite a lot, especially if we use the SfEP forums. One activity had us listing our top skill on a sticky note placed on a poster of collective skills, then listing a weakness to improve on another sticky note for a second poster. By the end we had created a ‘Skill Swap Shop’ to be shared. Very simple and effective. Melissa finished by sharing a useful Interactive CPD Toolkit.

Efficient editing

After lunch, Hester’s session was fascinating, if intensive. Our task was to judge what can and can’t be done in a job when clients are cutting costs and driving down schedules. Given non-fiction texts to discuss and prepare for copy-edit, we analysed each brief and project.

Hester’s tips on efficient editing were:

  • What essential work must be done within budget and by the deadline?
  • Know what your key priorities are and stick to them.
  • Use clean-up routines, keep track of the project and analyse when finished for timings and cost.

Navigating a course in publishing

The last session was a panel discussion chaired by Luke Finley. On the panel were Sarah Wray, Debbie Taylor and Alex Niven. Some questions from the delegates for discussion were:

  • How do editors deal with …?
  • How have you tackled a ‘muscular’ (*top* word of the conference) or heavy editing job with an author?
  • When do you get time to work on your own novel when you are an editor and enjoy writing?

All in all

Mini or one-day conferences are valuable for a variety of reasons.

  • Lasting only a day means they are not expensive in terms of time or money.
  • Their location may be nearer to you than the main SfEP annual conference.
  • They present more regular networking opportunities than waiting for the annual conference.
  • Participants are eligible for upgrade points.

After the surprise raffle, the final (unofficial) session headed to a nearby bar for drinks, which I had to miss in order to catch a train. But bravo and cheers to the NE Editors, especially Kia Thomas, for a valuable day!

Annie Deakins was a primary teacher in Essex for 30 years before retraining as a proofreader three years ago. An Intermediate Member of the SfEP, she runs Proofnow Proofreader. Connect with her on LinkedIn. She tutors primary children, edits her local parish magazine and blogs as #TallTartanTells.

 


Check out all the tweets from and about the day: #SfEPNEConf

The annual SfEP Conference takes place in Birmingham this year, on 14–16 September –  booking is still open!

Local SfEP groups organise mini-conferences: the next one, on 6 November, is in Toronto. If you would like to organise a mini-conference close to you, contact the Society’s Community director.


Proofread by Victoria Hunt, Entry-Level Member.
Posted by Abi Saffrey, SfEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.

 

Being a London Book Fair chair

By Katherine Demopoulos

I was asked to chair a panel session at the London Book Fair this year, thanks to my connection with Indonesia, which is the market focus country for 2019. I spent six very happy years working in Jakarta as a journalist and still jump at opportunities to recement the link with my second home.

The panel was called The City and the Sea, and featured two writers from Indonesia – Sheila Rooswitha Putri and Agustinus Wibowo – and a Scottish author, Malachy Tallack. My task was to introduce these brilliant writers, set the scene for a discussion on rural and urban identities, and keep the conversation moving.

Indonesia is incredibly diverse – 17,000 islands, megacities, isolated villages, global faiths and old religions, hundreds of languages, imposed identities, and persecution of minorities – so the theme works well as a way of explaining the country and the work of Agustinus and Sheila. Malachy’s island background in Shetland and his travels were starting points for thinking about links between the writers.

Doing the groundwork

I initially felt it might be a challenge to develop a flow for our hour-long session that would give the authors equal talking time, because their work is so different. Sheila lives in Jakarta and creates funny and clever graphic novels. Agustinus is a travel writer, whose most recent book intersperses travel stories with his mother’s terminal illness and his experiences of persecution as a minority Chinese Indonesian. Malachy’s warm and nurturing first novel, The Valley at the Centre of the World, focuses on life in a small community in Shetland, and follows his non-fiction work on islands that exist only in the imagination, and travels around the sixtieth parallel.

It took some enjoyable research to find ways of moving smoothly from author to author and subject to subject, beginning with the parameters we were given. The British Council, which manages the market focus programme, sent some material but – perhaps I’m an over-preparer – it wasn’t enough to gain a rounded understanding of each writer. I bought Malachy’s two non-fiction books, ordered Sheila’s first from Jakarta, and on YouTube found particularly helpful TV interviews and recordings from literary events.

A few weeks before the event, the British Council introduced the four of us via email, and I sent the writers a suggested plan for our hour. The email conversation was productive; the panel blurb mentioned climate change, but it transpired this wasn’t relevant for all authors. I wanted to make the best use of the hour by bringing up subjects the writers actually wanted to discuss.

Sheila and I met a few days before the event to talk about how the hour would work for her – it’s harder to showcase visual work on a panel session – and I explained my suggested lines of questioning to help her prepare. We talked a lot about Jakarta and Jakartans, and the meeting helped both of us, because I learned more about her work and motivations.

I felt a little out of practice at chairing discussion panels, because the last time I did so was five years ago at an event in Jakarta with the Indonesian defence minister. I’ve also been to discussions with loquacious moderators and know what not to do in a panel session, but felt that I was rusty on what to do.

Fortunately, I decided to go to the opening Indonesia session for the London Book Fair, and I’m very glad I did. It was moderated by the novelist Louise Doughty, and she was marvellous: warm, engaging, focused on the authors and not herself, clear and fluent in her introduction and questioning, and able to gently move on the discussion when necessary. She was a great example of how a moderator should be.

A group of people, seated, all facing towards an unseen speaker

Photo by Headway on Unsplash

The main event

On the day of the panel I surprised myself – I’m not a natural public speaker, though I’m learning – by really looking forward to it. I had time to chat to Malachy and Agustinus beforehand, so the discussion itself felt like an interesting conversation among friends – albeit with one quieter one (me as moderator) – and the added bonus of an audience listening and contributing questions.

I introduced the session by highlighting what makes the subject timely: deepening divides between rural and urban populations, the global trend towards urbanisation, and our increasingly city-centric economies. I also questioned whether identity can be broken down between rural and urban populations, and what other ways there are of looking at this question.

The discussion moved from Sheila’s definition of Jakartans as resilient, stubborn and quick to adapt – the qualities necessary to survive in a megacity beset with traffic, pollution and flooding – to Agustinus’s thoughts on minority identities. His book Zero: When the Journey Takes You Home is being made into a film, something he said could not have happened twenty years ago when Indonesia’s messy move from authoritarian rule to democracy was accompanied by anti-Chinese riots.

From Malachy’s travel book Sixty Degrees North, which contains themes of grief and home, I learned that Greenland doesn’t have a concept of land ownership. He and Agustinus talked about identity and relationships to land, and how these relationships manifest themselves and change. Having my well worked-out plan made it easier to respond to new tacks in the conversation. While preparing, I had found more talking points in Sixty Degrees North than in Malachy’s other books, but the conversation was fluid and naturally brought in several characters from his novel.

I really enjoyed the experience, thanks to the authors, the British Council and also to the advice given by a wise friend. ‘Trust your preparation’, she said. To read, research, and discuss ideas with interesting authors is pretty good, and to be able to call that ‘work’ is even better. If you’re asked to participate in a London Book Fair panel – do it. I’ve already volunteered for next year!

Katherine DemopoulosKatherine Demopoulos is a writer and editor with a background in journalism. She works on economics, commodities, fiction, travel and all things Indonesia, and is an Intermediate Member of the Society for Editors and Proofreaders.

 

 


SfEP members get the opportunity to represent the Society at the London Book Fair each year, via the Society’s stand in the exhibition hall and by participating in events.


Proofread by Emma Easy, Entry-Level Member.

Posted by Abi Saffrey, SfEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.

BookMachine: three benefits for editors and proofreaders

By Laura Summers

I run BookMachine, a thriving community for publishing professionals. We have been running for nearly nine years now and we pride ourselves on our ability to connect the people who actually make publishing happen. If you are looking to work on new projects and be at the forefront of the industry, then BookMachine is for you.

BookMachine logo

Here are three ways we can help you.

1. Access to book fairs

Traditionally, book fairs were the land of rights and editorial professionals – those negotiating over the finer points of a book sale. Starting at 8am, and often finishing in the early evening, fairs were a time to discuss upcoming titles for sale and meet potential partners from all over the world.

This is still at the heart of a book fair; however, there is a lot happening these days that can also benefit the rest of us – and that includes copy-editors and proofreaders. Over 25,000 publishing professionals will attend the London Book Fair next week and it is free to attend for BookMachine members. There is a packed seminar programme designed to provide knowledge, tools and insight for everyone working in the industry; and a host of opportunities to meet interesting industry professionals.

BookMachine always organise an informal event on the Wednesday afternoon – an opportunity for professionals to meet each other and relax after a day of meetings or seminars.

In the evening, we work in partnership with the London Book Fair team and host the Global Gathering, the goal of which is to help international visitors and UK publishers to meet and mingle, again in an informal setting.

2. Industry knowledge from your desk

If alongside your work, you crave knowledge, ideas and personal development, then you can access our knowledge base for free.

Like the SfEP blog, we aim to enhance the lives of our community. Unlike the SfEP blog, we don’t write exclusively for editors and proofreaders. The site collates articles divided into six channels – tech, design, editorial, marketing, business and audio. If you work in editorial, please don’t just read the editorial channel. The idea is to encourage people in different departments to work together. All the blog posts have been designed to help us do this.

We have been curating industry insights on the blog for such a long time that, whatever you are interested in finding out, we should have the answers for you. However, as an editor, if you can’t find a question answered, or think you have a better angle on one of our ideas – please let us know. We are an industry site, and although our expert Editorial Board keep us informed, there are always going to be niche areas we could all learn more about.

3. Industry knowledge on a night out

Early on in our own publishing careers we identified that many events for publishers are really quite formal and expensive. Unless an employer or client offers to pay for this, it can be quite prohibitive. We knew so many people wanting to learn more – but on their own terms, from their own pocket and in order to boost their own careers. This drove us to create events which are accessible to everyone (although we know we need to venture out of London more).

People gathered at a BookMachine event, in front of a neon sign saying 'Shhh.... it's a library'

Since 2010 we have hosted over 100 events for these people who actually make publishing happen, and in 2019 our event series BookMachine Unplugged is back to offer even more insight. There will be six informal events, each of which will zoom in on a vital area of the publishing industry and feature three expert speakers. Each evening has been programmed by an Editorial Board member and has been designed to inspire you with real insights into what is working in publishing right now. The events aren’t expensive to attend (£10 or free for BookMachine members) and we guarantee that editors and proofreaders will learn something interesting and meet someone new.

 

Laura SummersLaura Summers co-founded BookMachine in 2010, initially as an informal way for publishers to meet each other at events, and then as a popular site for anyone building a publishing career. The team have now organised over 100 events. In 2017 she launched BookMachine Works, a creative events and marketing agency, specialising in the publishing industry. Laura has spoken about events and publishing at the Frankfurt Book Fair, the London Book Fair, IPG Digital Quarterly, the Galley Club, BIC battles, Women in Publishing and the SYP conference.

Posted by Abi Saffrey, SfEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.

Inside Bloomsbury Publishing for Editors and Proofreaders

In a brand new event series, Inside Bloomsbury, Bloomsbury Publishing is opening up about how it creates and publishes its books by inviting key members of the Bloomsbury team to talk about what they do in more detail than ever before. In this second event of the series, a follow-up to ‘Inside Bloomsbury Publishing for Illustrators’, a panel of Bloomsbury editors discussed the skills needed to edit works that please authors, agents and publishers – in partnership with the SfEP. Andrew Macdonald Powney tells us more about the event on 25 October.

Door to Bloomsbury Publishing's offices on Bedford Square, London

Bloomsbury Publishing, Bedford Square, London.

Bloomsbury publishes 2,500 titles annually, 80% of which are non-fiction. Every seat at the Bloomsbury Institute was booked on 25 October for a discussion between three Bloomsbury editors: managing editor Marigold Atkey, senior editor Xa Shaw Stewart and special interest editor Jonathan Eyers. It was chaired by Abi Saffrey, an Advanced Professional Member of the SfEP.

Jonathan summed up the stages of the in-house process: a structural edit by the commissioning editor, then a copy-edit focused on clarity, next typesetting, and only then proofreading – with checking e-books coming last and paying least well, since by that stage most errors have been found. Bloomsbury wanted quick, thorough, accurate proofreaders. The firm tends not to recruit through the SfEP directory, but rather, according to their own intelligence and contacts, and through the constant stream of CVs dropping into their inboxes; Jonathan Eyers gave examples of proofreaders without previous experience whom he had employed because something particular made them stand out. Editors might well take note of training like SfEP and PTC courses, however.

Working with Bloomsbury

So how can proofreaders attract work – and repeat work – from Bloomsbury? As to breaking through in the first place, Jonathan returned a couple of times to saying that a letter looking for work plus a generic CV stands next to no chance in competition against a distinctive application from someone with specialist expertise. Editors are on the look-out for people who may know more than they do on a topic that might cross their desks. These get added to the contact list.

Once employed, a freelancer’s flexibility is important, and for tried-and-tested freelancers this can work both ways. Reliability and turnaround are essential. Timings might be 2 to 3 weeks for proofreading or 4 weeks for copy-editing a text of 80,000 to 100,000 words. It will pay the freelancer more in the long run to stick to the agreed fee. Failing to keep to the deadline is another great way to mark yourself out as a risky pick. A third classic error is forgetting to back up the text you have been sent, which you need in case of file corruption or queries over changes. Freelancers can also lose credibility by altering text when they should raise queries; changes to the text that turn up only at the proofreading stage mean alterations to the typeset text, and that is expensive. Both budgets and schedules are tight and margins for error will stretch only so far (Marigold has worked on 38 books to date this year).

Marigold Atkey, Xa Shaw Stewart, Jonathan Eyers and Abi Saffrey at the Bloomsbury Institute

Marigold Atkey, Xa Shaw Stewart, Jonathan Eyers and Abi Saffrey. Photo: Ruth Burns Warrens.

The same but different

In-house editors within the same firm may have different approaches. Marigold might line up a proofreader at the same time as the copy-editor, and she might look for an indexer or even a freelance map illustrator as well. Her brief with the Raven imprint brings in fantasy, and a recent book required a floor plan to go with the text. Xa’s work with cookbooks might lead her to seek out ghost writers or project editors (though Bloomsbury seldom has need of freelance project editors/managers). Jonathan’s team looks to commission and publish non-fiction texts for identified niche markets, which is why it is subject expertise in a proofreader that especially attracts him.

Publishers have slimmed down, but that increases the overall proportion of freelance work. Whereas a few years ago it seemed that a few conglomerates might buy up all the independents, another possible future for publishing may now be coming into view: many, small independents without physical offices, producing books through networks of freelancers in a world where almost no one is in-house.

Practicalities

The trend is towards electronic mark-up for copy-edits: though the vast majority of Bloomsbury’s proofreading is still on hard copy. Thus, the BSI marks remain indispensable because they are internationally understood. Editing using Track Changes in Word is pretty much the rule and the system, though Xa felt that working from a paper copy as well might still be most effective. Her particular titles create a premium on freelancers’ awareness of visuals and design. The passage from book to e-book is now practically seamless, requiring comparatively minor changes like the position of the copyright page, and there is little freelance work in this area. Encouragingly, though, outsourcing the process to cheaper markets has its limits, since Bloomsbury requires quality in production and editing, especially sensitivity to nuance and idiom. In cookbooks, not just “broil / grill” or “zucchini / courgette” but the density of flour (and therefore the amounts in a recipe) may vary between the US and the UK.

This early evening on Bedford Square saw the Bloomsbury Institute introduce trends present and future clearly and enjoyably to a large, varied, and interested audience. In a show of hands, only five or six attendees are based in-house. Perhaps those few will take back the idea of this event to other publishing houses too.

Andrew Macdonald PowneyAndrew Macdonald Powney is an Entry-Level Member of the SfEP. He taught Politics and RS in state and independent schools after taking degrees in History and Patristic Theology, and he is now based in Edinburgh. Andrew is interested in political, religious, theological, and educational texts, and Plain English. His own writing appeared most recently in The Tablet.

 

Posted by Abi Saffrey, SfEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.