Monthly Archives: October 2019

Editing memoir, life writing and creative non-fiction

At this year’s SfEP conference, writer Emma Darwin led a workshop that was mainly focused on non-fiction authors, but the many questions discussed are relevant to both authors and editors. Loulou Brown summarises Emma’s key things to consider when working through a text.

Creative life-writing/creative non-fiction uses the techniques of fiction to write real, non-fictional stories. Non-fiction work presents real life. It informs, summarises and reports, and separates facts from inferences and guesses. It is explicitly factually ‘true’, including uncertainties and gaps, and it acknowledges influences and assumptions.

The author should consider why they want to write about a particular subject, and what is at stake. It is then necessary to think about the project to be worked on.

  • What is important?
  • What will the project contain?
  • Whose story is it?
  • Who are the important people?
  • Where are the important places?
  • When do the important historical events take place?
  • What gets told and how?
  • Is there more than one story; if so, how are they related?
  • What might the ‘spine’ or ‘backbone’ of the narrative be?
  • What will the ‘vertebrae’ be?
  • Where does the author start?
  • Where does the author finish?

The author needs to decide the following:

  • What will their personal rule-book be for when to do what?
  • How will fictional techniques help to make the non-fiction material compelling?
  • Where are the gaps and ‘awkwardnesses’: in facts, causes and motivation; in thoughts, feelings and physical experiences? How will these be filled or bridged?
  • How will discrepancies be acknowledged and resolved, or discrepancies be acknowledged and left to lie?
  • How will explicit inferences, guesses and explanations be made?
  • How will they imagine, reinvent or alter?

The narrative is very important and the following issues need to be considered:

  • Who is doing the narrating?
  • How will the narrative put flesh on the spine?
  • Who or what is the narrative centred on?
  • How will the narrator draw the reader along the spine?
  • Where is the narrator ‘standing’, relative to the events?
  • What will the narrative evoke, dramatise, show?
  • Where will the narrative inform, summarise, tell?

Narrative techniques:

  • Using a narrator or storyteller and actors in the story.
  • Interweaving different timelines.
  • Working with point-of-view.
  • Showing versus telling (evoking/telling the reader; informing/explaining).
  • Working with voice and tone.
  • Working with psychic distance.

The author needs to think about his or her readers and consider the following questions:

  • Who is going to read what is written?
  • Will the journey be worth the reader’s time and money?
  • What is at stake for the reader?
  • How will the writer engage the reader?
  • Why should the reader care?
  • How is the reader convinced by what the writer is saying?

Emma listed a number of features that can go wrong with the manuscript. Editors should carefully take note of these potential problems.

  • The voice is not compelling enough.
  • The reader doesn’t care about what is being said.
  • The text is confusing, irritating, or too quiet, too noisy, too slow, too long, or too short, or too rushed.
  • The storytelling is jerky.
  • There is a ‘soggy’ middle.
  • The story fizzles out.
  • Although competent, the story is dull.
  • The text is over-written.
  • The text is under-written.
  • There are repetitions.
  • There is too much description.
  • There is too much introspection.

Emma ended her workshop with a list of potential problems that might arise between authors and publishers.

  • The publisher says that the author’s voice is dull and clunky.
  • The publisher gets frustrated because the author cannot remember what the publisher considers to be important incidents.
  • The publisher is irritated that the author won’t tell the ‘best’ bits.
  • The publisher is annoyed that the author finds it very difficult to write about important incidents.
  • The publisher is bored because the author feels it necessary to write about incidents in great detail.
  • The publisher is cross because the author over-explains events.
  • The publisher is peeved because the author doesn’t put in enough detail.
  • The publisher is upset because the author resists any restructuring.
  • The publisher is furious because the author balks at fairly drastic changes.
  • The publisher gives up when the author resists all changes to the text.
  • The author becomes paranoid when the publisher wants the text to be sexier.
  • The author is upset that the publisher does not appear to understand what they are writing about, given the changes the publisher wants to make to the text.
  • The author hates major restructuring of the text that they have worked on for years.
  • The author is disgusted that the publisher appears to be interested only in how much money the book will make and does not appear to be interested in the content of what has been written.
  • The author has a seizure when the publisher pushes hard for delivery of the text.

Loulou Brown is a professional member of the Society for Editors and Proofreaders. She has an MA in women’s studies and an MA in English literature. She specialises in editing academic work in the humanities and social sciences and has also edited a lot of biographies and autobiographies. Her major interest is in editing fiction and she has recently become an associate editor at Bloodhound Books, a crime fiction publisher.

Emma Darwin has published four books: two novels, The Mathematics of Love, and A Secret Alchemy; and a ‘how to’ manual, Get Started in Writing Historical Fiction. Her latest work, published this year, is a memoir about her family: This Is Not a Book about Charles Darwin. She has an MPhil in writing at the University of South Wales and has completed a PhD in creative writing at Goldsmiths, University of London.


Read more conference session summaries in the November/December edition of Editing Matters (free to members).


Proofread by Emma Easy, Entry-Level Member.
Posted by Abi Saffrey, SfEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.

Photo credits: Light bulbs  Skye Studios on Unsplash; Pen on book Aaron Burden on Unsplash.

‘You spend all day reading?’ Why we need the Chartered Institute of Editing and Proofreading

All events in this blog post are based on true experiences, as reported by editorial professionals. However, details have been changed to protect the identities of not only the editors but also their friends, family and contacts. Thanks to everyone who volunteered their stories.


It’s 8.30am on a typical Wednesday morning. I’ve been up for two hours and, after hanging out all the laundry and getting the kids up and off to school, I finally sit down at my desk and check my To Do list. Today, I have a specialist journal article and its references to edit, six people’s comments and corrections to collate on a textbook’s second proofs and a weekly catchup meeting with an in-house project manager. I smile to myself. I love my job and I’m still basking in the happy news that soon the SfEP will become the Chartered Institute of Editing and Proofreading.

I check the 15 emails I’ve received overnight. The author of the article has sent a new version with 2,000 extra words and 15 new references but hasn’t used Track Changes so I can’t immediately tell what’s different. One of the consultants on the textbook has asked for the chapters to be reordered. I settle down to work.

9am: An email arrives from a marketing agency. ‘Here’s a PDF of our latest brochure. It just needs a final proofread by lunchtime.’ Apparently, by ‘final proofread’, they mean complete restructure using different words. I respond explaining, as I did last time they made the same request, that the level of changes required means it would have been quicker and cheaper for everyone if I’d have been able to edit the text in Word before it was set in InDesign. They ask how much this would cost. I give them my standard copyediting rate, which reflects my years of continuing professional development and experience. They reply that their budget doesn’t stretch to more than half that amount for such a simple task – after all, they haven’t spotted any typos in the leaflet. I politely decline the job so that I can maintain my professional integrity (and, by extension, that of the SfEP).

9.30am: The email reminds me that I used to do a lot of work for another agency, so I call my contact there. He apologetically tells me that all editing and proofreading is now handled in-house to save money. The new boss had questioned why external editors were charging twice for doing one job. My contact had tried to explain that copyediting and proofreading were two different aspects of a thorough editorial approach but the boss now gives all the ‘checking’ to a marketing assistant with an English degree. My contact confides that they’ve made a few mistakes in their marketing material recently that have ‘negatively impacted their brand perception key indicators’.

11am: My edit is interrupted by the phone. I consider not answering but it’s my mother and there might be a family emergency.

Mum: ‘Hello! I was going to phone your sister about this, but I don’t like ringing her when she’s at work. Are you working?’
Me: ‘Yes, Mum. I’m always working at this time.’
Mum: ‘Ha ha, yes, you work too hard! I do wish you’d start actually using your qualifications, though, after you spent all that time studying. What job do you say you do again? You’re a word processor or something?’
Me: ‘I’m a copyeditor.’
Mum: ‘When are you going to become a real editor? Anyway, I called to tell you …’ [Long story of exactly zero importance or urgency ensues about some relative I don’t know.]
Me: ‘Mmm … uh huh … really? … Oh dear … yes … I mean no, that’s terrible!’ [Trying to sound interested and maintain work mode.]
Mum: ‘Are you listening to me?’
Me: ‘Well, actually, I’ve got this deadline …’
Mum: ‘Well, why didn’t you say so?’

12.30pm: The doorbell rings. I think it’s the postie needing me to sign for a contract I’m expecting by registered post so I answer the door. It turns out to be a friend holding a homemade cake.

Friend: ‘Hi! I was just passing and I knew you’d be at home so I thought I’d pop in for a quick coffee.’
Me: ‘Er, it’s nice to see you but I actually have a deadline today.’
Friend: ‘Oh, I’ll only be half an hour. It’s lunchtime! Time for a break!’

She walks in and casts a critical eye on the unwashed breakfast dishes.

Friend: ‘Oh, I could never work from home! I’d get too distracted by the housework!’
Me: [Ahem, clearly that’s not my problem …] ‘If I spent all day doing the housework, I wouldn’t get paid.’
Friend: ‘Oh, come on, your husband has a good job. You don’t need to work!’
Me: ‘Editing is my career. It’s taken me years to get to where I am now.’ [To gain the skills, experience and contacts to get a steady stream of work and become an Advanced Professional Member of the SfEP.]
Friend: ‘So which book are you reviewing at the moment?’
Me: ‘I’ve told you before, I’m not a reviewer, I’m an editor. I don’t comment on it, I fix it. Reviewing and editing are different jobs.’
Friend: ‘Oh, so you just run spellchecks all day? Beats a real job! Right, no more time to chat – I’m off to my Pilates class.’

I’d been planning on a walk round the block but I don’t have time now so I get back to work.

3pm: I go to pick up the kids from school. A mother I’ve never spoken to corners me.

Her: ‘You’re a proofreader aren’t you?’
Me (warily): ‘Well, I’m mainly an editor but yes, I do proofread …’
Her: ‘I’ve decided to become a proofreader too. I’m always spotting mistakes in books. There was a typo in the crime novel I’m reading. If you’ve got any overspill work, let me know!’
Me: ‘I don’t suppose you’ve got half a day to edit 1,500 references into Chicago style and cross-check them against the citations?’
Her: ‘Um.’

A father has been listening in.

Him: ‘You’re a proofreader? I didn’t know that was still a thing. Do they actually employ people just to do that stuff? Isn’t there software for that?’
Me: ‘Yes, my brain.’
A nearby childminder looks scandalised: ‘You spend all day reading? Flipping through books? Nice for some – the rest of us have work to do!’

With perfect timing, my youngest child rushes out of the classroom and announces that he got 100% in his English comprehension test. The adults are suddenly silent.

3.30pm: As I get home, a neighbour comes over to chat. I ask how her husband is after his recent operation.

Neighbour: ‘I think he’s all right but I’ve not been able to get over to see him in hospital today. I was hoping Roger opposite would give me a lift – he works from home like you, you know, but he’s a man. He’s not got to ferry his kids around all day like you do.’
Me: ‘Perhaps he’s contracted to work certain hours. If he’s self-employed, he might even work longer hours than people with office jobs.’
Neighbour: ‘But he’s got time to walk his dog! Oh, by the way, here’s your copy of the charity cookery book you helped with.’

Inside the house, I eagerly look at the book. I’d voluntarily spent hours laying out pages, sourcing illustrations and explaining how to pay for them, warning them of copyright infringement and copyediting the recipes. The acknowledgements merely thank me for sorting out the author’s grammar.

4.30pm: An email arrives from a graduate student, for whom English is a second language. ‘I have just finished writing my MSc dissertation and need some urgent editing and academic proofreading work done. It’s about 70,000 words. This may be the final proofreading I do before submission this week by Friday.’ I politely decline.

5pm: I’ve put my focusing skills to use today and made quite a bit of progress, despite everything. I take a quick look at Facebook. A friend is starting up a small business and asks about GDPR and how tax is handled by sole traders. I send her a copy of my GDPR policy and a quick outline of the HMRC self-assessment process. She’s grateful for my help and messages back, ‘You’re wasted as a proofreader! I didn’t know you knew about this sort of thing! I thought you were just a language pedant. Is that how you spell pedant? I’m scared you’re going to correct me!’ I respond, ‘Don’t worry, if you’re not paying me, I won’t correct you.’ She replies, ‘Oh, I was going to ask you to check my new web text but I’ll ask my English-teacher friend if you want paying for it.’

5.30pm: I’ve still got a few hours’ work to do, after all today’s interruptions. Just before I return to the endless references, I remind myself of the SfEP’s original rationale for chartership:

‘We want to see greater appreciation of the value of good editing (in its widest sense), based on recognised qualifications, high standards and an understanding of what editorial professionals do, with a commensurate rise in their status and pay.’ (www.sfep.org.uk/about/governance/aim-of-chartership)

It seems that, as a member of the Chartered Institute of Editing and Proofreading, I’ll soon be taking another step in my ongoing public relations journey.


Photo credits: Man on sofa – Austin Distel on Unsplash; Head in book Siora Photography on Unsplash

Proofread by Victoria Hunt, Intermediate Member.
Posted by Abi Saffrey, SfEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.

Seven things you didn’t know about the SfEP social media team

With a colossal 27,000 Facebook ‘Likes’, more than 10,000 Twitter followers, and edging towards 12,000 followers on LinkedIn, the SfEP social media accounts are a popular way of promoting the Society to a wider audience and a way of meeting edibuddies.

But have you ever wondered who the digital ninjas anonymously posting links are? It’s time to reveal all about the SfEP’s social media team.

1. Members of the Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn teams are each responsible for a particular day or week.

The Twitter team is currently Richard Sheehan, Alison Walters and Anna Nolan. As well as posting, they also respond to any tweets directly addressed to @TheSfEP during the day they’re on duty. At time of writing, there are two vacancies on the team.

Facebook is our most popular platform and our team is currently Eilidh McGregor, Cathy Tingle and Rachel Hamar. At time of writing, there are two vacancies up for grabs here too.

Our LinkedIn profile is monitored by Jo Johnston, who tweaks and posts content from our blog (managed by Abi Saffrey). Despite posting regularly for just shy of a year, the SfEP on LinkedIn is proving extremely popular with editors and proofreaders all over the world, and we are seeing great engagement here, so don’t forget to find and follow us!

Community director Vanessa Plaister and marketing and PR director Denise Cowle oversee the teams and help us monitor any tricky responses we may get.

2. We’re all volunteers and also run our own freelance businesses.

We’re not elected to a committee or paid for our time. We are all at different stages of our editorial careers but we all feel it is important to actively support the work of the SfEP.
Our volunteer roles can be thought of as a bit of a side hustle.

Jo says: ‘I think you gain more than you give when you volunteer and that’s been true for my time volunteering with the SfEP. It’s injected a bit of discipline and structure into my working week, and at the same time I can piggyback onto the SfEP posts for personal use, which is a bonus.’

Cathy says: ‘Working in the social media team has helped me become more confident with the workings of Facebook and other platforms. It has helped me review my own social media strategy and revive my ailing LinkedIn account, which all helps raise the profile of my business.’

3. We share posts beforehand.

The team uses a closed Facebook group to share suggested links or ask questions. We lay claim to content that we find there, as well as content that we’ve found ourselves.

Cathy says: ‘I love finding interesting stories online, but my favourite part of the job is undoubtedly writing the text to go with the articles. It allows me to be creative in a way that I don’t have the opportunity for otherwise.’

The SfEP’s social media pages aim to provide links to useful or entertaining posts about books, language, editing and proofreading, and other issues to do with freelance life or running your own business. We also acknowledge the achievements of our members and promote the work of the SfEP. External links are interspersed with links to the SfEP website and blog, so that those who have discovered us only via our social media streams can find out more about the SfEP and perhaps even become members.

4. We are truly international.

About a third of our Facebook fans are from the USA, with 5,000 from the UK, and Canada, India, Australia and South Africa close behind in terms of numbers, followed by the Philippines, Mexico, Italy and Pakistan. Although we are a UK-based society, we try to bear this cultural variety in mind, for example by posting links that may be of particular interest to Canadians and Americans later in the day.

Rachel says: ‘Having recently moved out of the UK, I thought this would be a good way to stay in touch with the editing community and developments in publishing while I’m not working full time.’

5. We agonise over errors.

We’re painfully aware of how it looks if the SfEP’s posts have typos. But sometimes, as with any project, errors slip through when we are juggling paid work and other commitments with our admin roles. Believe us when we say we cringe and put it right as soon as we realise.

Anna says: ‘We beg a little patience from those who are quick to point out mistakes. We’re only human and we’d prefer comments to focus on the content of the links, not the introductory copy.’

Cathy says: ‘We can’t always get it right. We keep an eye on the comments so that we can respond as swiftly as possible when someone expresses disapproval or disappointment.’

6. It’s always a learning curve.

We don’t volunteer purely out of the goodness of our hearts – an element of continuing professional development is key.

Richard says: ‘It feels good doing something to contribute and it also keeps me up to date with what’s being posted around the internet.’

7. We’re always looking for more volunteers.

The formula of posting links to external content and the SfEP website and blog works well. A few people have said that our social media feeds are among the best they’ve seen from an organisation like ours. We’re delighted to receive such positive feedback and are proud of what we achieve as a team.

Anna says: ‘I love being part of a friendly, helpful and communicative team. I think we all work well together and there is a really strong sense of cohesion among us!’


If you’re a SfEP member and interested in joining the SfEP’s social media team, contact Vanessa Plaister: community@sfep.org.uk


This post is an updated version of Julia Sandford-Cooke’s post from January 2016: 10 things you didn’t know about the SfEP social media teams. Many thanks to Jo Johnston for the comprehensive revisions.

Photo credits: Happy jigsaw people – Alexas_Fotos from Pixabay; Smart phone Rami Al-zayat on Unsplash.

Posted by Abi Saffrey, SfEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.

Plain English: new resources for editors

By Laura Ripper and Luke Finley

Are you thinking of adding plain-English editing to your services? Perhaps you have done so already, and you’d like to promote your service to more clients. Maybe you work in-house for an organisation that uses plain English, editing your colleagues’ writing. Or perhaps you’ve been hearing more about this thing known as ‘plain English’ lately, and you want to find out what it’s all about.

If that sounds like you, you might be interested in two new resources:

Using plain English (also known as plain language) helps organisations fulfil their purpose, whether it’s to make a difference in society or to make a profit for shareholders. Organisations in the public sector have a responsibility to communicate clearly so that people can use public services, understand how decisions affect them and take part in public life. Researchers write plain-English summaries to make academic knowledge accessible to more people. And private companies use plain English as a marketing tool and to save time and money on sorting out misunderstandings.

As more organisations see the advantages of using plain English, more of them are working with language professionals to make sure their documents are genuinely easy to read, use and understand. And more editors are working outside traditional publishing for the kinds of clients who want support with plain English, either as well as or in place of a ‘standard’ edit.

Plain English is about much more than word choice and sentence length; anyone who provides plain-English support needs to know about all the guidelines, techniques and tools and when to use them. Most importantly, they need to use them in a balanced and nuanced way. That puts editors, who are experienced in considering the finer points of language use as well as the wider context, in a good position to help.

If you want to find out about the basics of plain-English editing, the updated guide is a helpful introduction to what’s involved. If you want to learn more and gain some practice, the new course will help you to build on the skills you already have and use them in the context of plain English.

Editing into Plain English guide

We’ve updated the original SfEP guide on plain English, written by Sarah Carr, to reflect how the market has changed since it was first published.

What does it cover?

The guide is an introduction to plain-English editing. It includes information about:

  • What plain English is, and what it isn’t.
  • Evidence for the benefits of using plain English.
  • Training and qualifications.
  • Plain-English services you could provide, and how to price them.
  • Marketing your services and finding clients.
  • Working with clients in practice, especially non-publishers.
  • Software that can help.
  • Useful resources.

What’s changed since the first edition?

We’ve updated the guide throughout, but in particular you’ll find new information on:

  • Recent developments in plain English around the world, and which sectors are using it.
  • How plain English benefits business clients.
  • Ways to market your services and find clients.
  • What to consider when discussing a project with a client.
  • Resources and further reading.

Plain English for Editors online course

This new course looks at plain English from the perspective of editing. It explains how to use widely accepted guidelines to improve text that has already been written, and looks at the challenges involved.

Who is it for?

The course is for you if you:

  • Already provide plain-English services and want to develop your skills.
  • Want to branch out into providing plain-English services.
  • Want to use plain-English techniques as part of your other editing services.
  • Work in-house and edit colleagues’ writing.

What does it cover?

This course aims to explain what plain English is, give you the skills to use guidelines on plain-English editing with thought and care, and develop your understanding of how to market your services and deal with challenges. It covers:

  • What plain English is, and what it’s for.
  • The history of the plain-English ‘movement’ and more recent developments in uses and thinking.
  • Six main guidelines for plain-English editing, from word choice to layout.
  • Tools in Word and other software that can help, and the pitfalls to watch out for.
  • The practicalities of plain English editing – working with clients, dealing with misconceptions and challenging texts, and marketing your services.

The course gives you plenty of practice in using the guidelines with careful judgement, considering the context, the reader’s needs and the client’s needs. This helps you to develop the skills needed to genuinely improve clarity and ease of reading, rather than applying a set of ‘rules’ that simply tick a box.

In short, if you’re an editor offering plain-English services – or hoping to do so in future – these two resources will make an essential contribution to your continuing professional development (CPD). And if you’re a client or commissioner of editing services, and making your copy clear and easily understood is one of your priorities, you can be confident that any editor who draws on these resources is well equipped to help you achieve this.


Laura Ripper is a self-employed copy-editor and an Advanced Professional Member of the SfEP. She started out at Plain English Campaign in 2004, editing documents for private companies and public-sector organisations. After that she joined Foundations and then Digital Outreach – companies that worked with charities on behalf of the UK government. As an editor, she helped these companies communicate clearly with various audiences. She has also taught English as a foreign language in Russia and China. She has co-written the SfEP online course Plain English for Editors and the SfEP guide Editing into Plain English.

Luke Finley set up Luke Finley Editorial in 2013/14 and is an Advanced Professional Member of the SfEP. Most of his working life until 2014 was spent in the voluntary and public sectors, which gave him a keen interest in plain English and trying to persuade people to communciate more clearly. He also wrote and delivered various kinds of training. As an editor, he has presented on plain English at two SfEP conferences and is the co-author of (with Laura Ripper) the SfEP online course Plain English for Editors and (with Laura Ripper and Sarah Carr) the SfEP guide Editing into Plain English.


Head to the SfEP website to sign up for the Plain English for Editors course and to buy the Editing into Plain English guide.


Proofread by Joanne Heath, Entry-Level Member.
Posted by Abi Saffrey, SfEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.

Learn and be inspired: Toronto mini-conference 2019

By Christine Stock

It’s autumn, and with the changing leaves and cooler temperatures, minds return to more work-related things, not least of all training and continuing professional development. Hot on the trail of the successful Society for Editors and Proofreaders (SfEP) Birmingham conference is the Toronto SfEP group’s second mini-conference; a conference international in content, speakers and delegates, on Wednesday 6 November. Jam-packed with international editing superstars, including both speakers and delegates – it’s not one to miss.

New to the schedule this year is a pre-conference workshop to be held on Tuesday 5 November. Dr Malini Devadas (Australia) holds a PhD in neuroscience but loves working with words more than working in a lab. An editor since 2004, Malini has spent a number of years studying marketing and the role mindset plays in gaining clients. Her workshop is ideal for any editor who wants more income, more clients, or both.

Whether you want to gain new skills or simply re-energise, this year’s one-day conference is for you. Leading off the day is the UK’s Paul Beverley (fondly known as Macro Man due to his impressive collection of more than 650 macros). Paul’s ‘marvellous macros’ will save us time and energy, not to mention make us look good. Paul’s tips, which he shares generously and with precise instruction, will provide delegates with a set of tools they can use immediately.

Next up is the renowned Jennifer Glossop (Canada). Jennifer’s impressive editing portfolio includes books that have won the Governor General’s Award and the Crime Writers of Canada Award, as well as those nominated for the Giller Prize and the Books in Canada First Novel Award. With more than 40 years’ experience in publishing, and with an extensive client list that includes Margaret Atwood and David Suzuki, her session on ‘finding the missing parts in a narrative’ is certain to assist both fiction and non-fiction editors alike, whether they are experienced or less experienced.

The afternoon’s presentations will be equally engaging and informative. Erin Brenner (US) will begin the sessions with a discussion on editing efficiently, a goal I’m certain we all have. Erin has been in the publishing industry for more than two decades and has published hundreds of articles and blog posts on writing and editing. Her experience as a writing trainer for communications specialists and her reputation as a highly skilled editor with top-notch professionalism will make her session a game-changer for those wanting time management and other efficiency advice.

Following Erin is Heather Ebbs (Canada), an indexer, writer and editor for nearly 40 years. Heather’s experience as a writer of hundreds of indexes covering a broad range of subjects and styles, as well as her role as instructor (since 2009) of Indexing: Theory and Application at the University of California Berkeley Extension Program, make her the ideal presenter for a session on all things indexing. Heather’s highly anticipated presentation will benefit both editors and indexers (and those who are interested in expanding into indexing).

Next is Amy Schneider (US), a freelance copyeditor and proofreader since 1995. Amy’s vast experience includes working on college textbooks, trade non-fiction, university press books and fiction in a variety of genres. An experienced presenter on editorial topics for numerous associations, including the Editorial Freelancers Association and ACES: The Society for Editing, Amy’s session on customising your workspace with templates promises to be chock-full of helpful takeaways.

My anticipation for the November activities is bolstered by fond memories of the Toronto SfEP group’s first mini-conference, which was held in 2018 and was equally international. I arrived at the beautiful venue eager to learn from the star-studded roster of speakers and left with ideas, tips and knowledge I just couldn’t wait to try out. Additionally, I shared insights, commiserated and joked with quickly made friends and colleagues. I had found my professional family.

This year’s conference and workshop, with the line-up of presenters, spread of delicious food and celebration of the SfEP’s recent chartership announcement, are bound to be a great success. If you’re looking for a reason to hone your skills, learn new tips, find a friendly, inclusive-minded and supportive group of editorial professionals, the conference and the workshop are for you. Presented by co-organisers Maya Berger, Kelly Lamb, Janet MacMillan and Rachel Small, it will be a day to be remembered and celebrated as wordsmiths unite. On behalf of the organisers and the rest of the local Toronto SfEP group, we hope to see you there.


Register for the Toronto mini-conference now!


Christine Stock is a Professional Member of the SfEP. She enjoys hot beverages on cold days and adores all things words and travel. Her editing specialities include fiction and creative non-fiction, and, in 2016, she was nominated for the Rosemary Shipton Award for Excellence in Book Editing provided by Ryerson University (Toronto). She can frequently be found at the corner coffee shop or at the monthly Toronto SfEP meetings.

 


Proofread by Alice McBrearty, Entry-Level Member.
Posted by Abi Saffrey, SfEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.

Photo credits: Toronto sign at night Maarten van den Heuvel on Unsplash; Passion led us here – Ian Schneider on Unsplash.