What’s new in PerfectIt 3?

PerfectIt 3, a new, updated version of the popular software that many of us find invaluable, has just been launched by Intelligent Editing. Wendy Toole looks at what the new version has to offer.

PerfectItscreen

The first difference to notice with PerfectIt 3 is that it has its own ribbon tab (or its own toolbar in Word 2003), not only making its new features instantly available but also opening up and drawing attention to existing features that may have skipped a user’s notice in earlier versions. There is simple access to ‘Reports’ and ‘Help’ groups, and also the new ‘Style Sheets’ group that now includes many options in addition to basic UK or US English spelling, such as Australian or Canadian, and a choice of house styles such as those of the European Union and the WHO.

Of the many new tests included in PerfectIt 3, the ones that appeal to me as an editor mostly of academic humanities texts are those for accents/foreign characters, italics, and brackets and quotes left open. The test for accents/foreign characters will draw your attention to inconsistencies such as ‘café’ and ‘cafe’. The italics test includes a selection of phrases such as a priori and inter alia, to which you can also add your own items: you select whether you want the terms always, never or consistently italicised, with the default being for consistency. (My authors often italicise ‘HMS’ in names of ships, so I’ll be adding that to the ‘never’ list …) What the test for brackets and quotes being left open can do to help you doesn’t need explaining.

Useful for STM

Among the new tests that will be of particular use to editors working on STM-type texts are those for superscripts and subscripts, percentage symbols and non-breaking spaces with measurements. They are also likely to appreciate having the useful ‘Table of Abbreviations’ accessible on the ribbon. PerfectIt 3 is even more customisable than its predecessor, and the ‘Style Sheets’ group in the ribbon makes the many available options easy to negotiate. Among those that will be welcomed by almost everyone are options to set capitalisation styles in different heading levels, and tests for the hyphenation of prefixes (as with the italics test, you can opt for always, never and consistency). Also – to my surprise and delight – there is now the facility to carry out wildcard find and replace routines: if you have a special F&R that does just the thing you want, such as replacing hyphens in number ranges with en dashes, which I seem to use in every job I do, simply paste it in on the ‘Wildcards’ tab of the ‘Style Sheet Editor’.

Skip sections

Another new feature that will be a great time-saver for many of us is the option to tell PerfectIt 3 to skip particular sections of text when running checks. Anyone who edits material with a lot of quotes from other sources will appreciate this, not to mention those – probably most of us at one time or another – whose work contains bibliographies. As well as opting to exclude from checking all text between straight/curly single/double quotes in ‘Choose Sections to Check’, you can type in the name of the Word style you have applied to your block quotes, and these will be skipped too. Footnotes, endnotes, references and bibliographies can all be excluded from the tests in their entirety, and you can also exclude all italic text elsewhere in your document.

Bespoke style sheets

As in PerfectIt 2, it is simple to make bespoke style sheets (either from scratch or based on an existing style sheet to which you wish to make customisation tweaks) to suit each of your clients. The new ‘Edit Current Style’ feature not only contains more options than were available in PerfectIt 2 but, with its plus-size dialogue box, is extraordinarily user friendly.

As a longtime user of PerfectIt, I was delighted to be asked to test and review PerfectIt 3. Unlike many software updates we’ve all struggled with, the new version is a clear and substantial improvement. Here, I have only scratched the surface of what it can do to help you perfect your documents. PerfectIt 3 is free to try, so do take a look whether you are a PerfectIt2 user or new to the product. I think you will like it. I certainly do.

Find out more at www.intelligentediting.com.

Wendy Toole profile pic

Wendy Toole is an advanced professional member and past chair (2011–2013) of the SfEP. She edits mainly academic humanities subjects, and historical and literary fiction. Her private passions include Victorian London, Victorian literature, and old maps and photographs. Follow Wendy on Twitter or find her on LinkedIn.

 

This review originally appeared in the May/June edition of Editing Matters, the membership magazine of the Society for Editors and Proofreaders.

Members of the SfEP get a 15% discount on PerfectIt. If you’re already a member, log in to the Members’ area of the website for details.

2 thoughts on “What’s new in PerfectIt 3?

  1. Erik

    Your abbreviation ‘STM’ means nothing to me, nor (plausibly) to Wikipedia’s list of possible interpretations.

    Please could you explain what it stands for in the context of your review?

    Reply
  2. Liz Jones Post author

    In the publishing context this refers to ‘scientific, technical and medical’. I hope that helps.

    Reply

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