Tag Archives: social media

Social media round-up March 2017

In case you missed them, here are some of the most popular links and members’ blogs shared across the SfEP’s social media channels (Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn) in March.

Members’ blogs

How to write great characters by Sophie Playle

Plagiarism: how to spot it and what to do about it by Hazel Bird

The highs and lows of editorial fees (or how not to trip up during rate talk) by Louise Harnby

Fact checking – vital or a waste of time? by Sara Donaldson

What are the types of transcription? by Liz Dexter

The business of editing: a page is a page – or is it? by Richard Adin

London Book Fair 2017 by Catherine Dunn

5 tips to reduce stress and boost productivity by John Espirian

Social media

5 ways to break the vicious circle of newbies

Is writer’s block a real thing, or just a figment of the imagination?

Tracing the birth of words: from ‘open’ to ‘heffalump’

I feel so bad! (The language of feeling guilty)

How to print dyslexia friendly books – and why

13 kinds of grammar trolls we love to hate

What’s logical about English?

Collated and posted by Tracey Roberts, SfEP blog coordinator

SfEP social media round-up January 2017

In case you missed them, here are some of the most popular links and members’ blog posts shared across the SfEP’s social media channels (Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn) in January.


Wish you were here, subjective mood!

Quiz: how good is your American English?

How a timeline helps you plot a novel

Nouns that exist only in the plural or singular form

Editing the academic voice

Anaïs Nin on how reading awakens us from the slumber of almost-living

How do dogs understand words?

How comics are made

Copy edit tihs!

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Members’ blogs

What did this proofreader learn over the past 12 months? By Louise Harnby

No bullshit please by Sara Donaldson

How to make the switch to fiction editing by Sophie Playle (published by LibroEditing)

Crunching the numbers by Liz Jones

Monetising feedback and embracing fragility by Hazel Bird

Bookmarking for better editing by Richard Adin

Thinking fiction: what novels do fiction editors read? By Carolyn Healy (published by An American Editor)

Posted by Tracey Roberts, SfEP blog coordinator

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP

Finding our community spirit for the new year

We all know that the SfEP exists to uphold editorial excellence. It does this through a membership structure that encourages all members to develop and hone their skills, and by running a strong programme of training and mentoring to support this. But the Society also exists for and through its members, a network of individuals from all sorts of backgrounds and doing many kinds of editorial work – our community of editorial professionals.

So, what makes us a community?

As community director, I’d say it involves sharing certain values and responsibilities. Our values include striving to be the best proofreaders and editors we can be. Our responsibilities (alongside delivering skilled and professional services to our clients, of course) include helping each other live up to those values, supporting those new to our profession and sharing experience among ourselves to enable us all to be successful.

But how do we provide that mutual support in a profession where many of us work at home or in relative isolation, and with members all over the world, including some in remote locations? Well, the SfEP has a number of activities and resources that help foster a sense of community. Some involve meeting face to face, while others use the internet to shrink the distance between us.

Meeting in person: local groups

The SfEP has 38 local groups throughout the United Kingdom, all organised by volunteer coordinators. Groups hold regular meetings, usually in an informal setting, and often, I’ve noticed, involving food and drink. What each group does varies, but all the events provide opportunities to pass on knowledge and to network.

Kathrin Luddecke encapsulates the essence of our local groups in her recent post about the Oxford group:

“While [training] was excellent and really helped me develop best practice… it was the friendly exchanges with others in the local group, the chance to swap experiences, ask questions and share frustrations… that made all the difference to me wanting to keep going. There’s nothing quite like mutual support!”

Those who don’t yet belong to the Society can attend up to three local meetings. A number of people have commented that being able to ‘try before you buy’ like this helped them decide whether editing was right for them.

Read more blog posts about what people get out of their local groups.

And for those who are remotely located, either within the UK or abroad, there’s always our Skype club, which ‘e-meets’ every month.

Meeting en masse: the conference

Our annual  conference provides many stimulating and educational sessions, as well as plenty of opportunities for networking. However nervous people may feel about attending a big event like this, they always seem to go away with a smile on their face, having made new friends, and fired up with enthusiasm to put into practice everything they have learned.

The theme of this year’s conference is Context is key: Why the answer to most questions is ‘It depends’. You’ll be hearing much more about this before booking opens in March, so I won’t steal our conference director’s thunder. In the meantime, we have a number of blog posts that give a flavour of how people feel about attending conference.

The forums: an online watercooler

For times when we can’t meet face to face, the forums are a vital part of the SfEP community. Run by our internet director and his web content editors, and assisted in the day-to-day management by a team of voluntary moderators, the forums are a bit like an online watercooler, where members from all over the world talk about all things editorial, and some things non-editorial.

It’s here where the community spirit is perhaps most evident, with members sharing their experience and expertise on all things from getting started in proofreading and editing to advanced Word wrangling, to that knotty punctuation or grammar question. New members are always given a warm welcome, and more experienced members are generous with their advice and support.

Extending our community: blog and social media

Blog

This, our blog, is where we reach out beyond our community to show our face to the outside world. Tracey Roberts, another volunteer, coordinates it all and we aim to provide a range of interesting and entertaining content relevant to professional editors and proofreaders and anyone who uses editors and proofreaders. And – in exciting news – this has recently been recognised as we heard last week that the SfEP blog has made it through to the final eight of the UK Blog Awards 2017. The winners will be announced on Friday 21 April 2017, so keep your fingers crossed for us!

We are already putting together some great ideas for posts over the coming months, including tips on building your business for the new year, and editing and writing fiction, to coincide with National Storytelling Week at the beginning of February.

But what would you like to see here? Do let us know what types of posts you enjoy and find most useful, or if there’s a subject you’d like to see discussed here.

Social media

As you may know, the SfEP has been increasing its social media presence. This helps raise our profile and allows us to attract more members, enabling us to grow and extend what we can do for our community. Thanks to our splendid team of social media volunteers, every day we keep people informed about what the SfEP is doing as well as posting stimulating content related to editing, publishing and freelancing more generally. And we are increasingly engaging directly with members and non-members, spreading the word… and the love.

You can now follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Google+.

And finally… huge thanks to all our community volunteers!

You may have noticed a theme running through everything I’ve talked about here, and that is the huge contribution that is made by our volunteers. Without them, many of the SfEP’s community activities simply could not take place. So I’d like to end by saying a big thank you to every single person who puts their time and energy into making the SfEP what it is – a welcoming, supportive community of editorial professionals.

Eleanor Parkinson, one of our newer members, summed up the essence of the SfEP community spirit in a recent post on our Newbies forum:

“I don’t believe I have ever come across a professional organisation that provides as much practical, real-life help to people trying to get started in that industry.” 

Sue Browning Sue Browning, SfEP community director

 

 

 

Posted by Tracey Roberts, SfEP blog coordinator

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP

Kick-start your freelancing business in 2017

Every year is the year you are going to be your best. Each and every January you vow to make amends and to take your business to new heights. This year, 2017, will be different. Below we have listed 8 ways that you can make it happen this year. With things you can do from the sofa to ways you can expand your current business pipeline – this handy list from BookMachine is all you need.

1. Social media

Successful business owners are not on social media all day long. However, they do know how to use it to their benefit. Allocate a set amount each day to interact with your followers. Share relevant news, and be interested as well as interesting. Set up lists of your key prospects and contacts and head directly to these lists each time you log on, rather than losing hours with mindless online chatter with everyone on Twitter.

2. Re-assess your rate card

If you have been freelance for a while, chances are you have a fixed rate you have been working to for some time. A new year is the perfect time to re-assess this. Are you earning as much as you would like? Could you charge a higher hourly rate? If this isn’t possible, think about your payment terms or your charges for late delivery and payment – there are many ways you can turn your business up a notch whilst working with an existing client base.

3. Contact everyone you have ever known

Perhaps you are happy with your hourly rate and your terms but want to increase your customer base. The new year is the perfect excuse to get in touch with everyone you have ever known! Wish them a happy new year and remind them about your services and let them know how happy last year’s clients were. Don’t leave this until you aren’t busy. As you know, it can take months for a project to come to fruition, and there’s no harm in getting the wheels turning right away.

4. Befriend your competition

As a freelancer, your competition can actually enhance your business. If you work in tandem with someone who has similar skills to you, then you can pass over work to each other and essentially grow as a business – perhaps even co-branded. Similarly, someone who you perceive to be a competitor might actually have different strengths, meaning that a partnership whereby each of you takes on a different role (one copy-editor and one content editor, for example) might actually help you to expand.

5. Sort out your website

Your website is your shop window. Even if you mainly work on print projects, your prospective customers will judge you by your site. Do you have a brand? Is it modern enough? Can you find examples of client projects and is it easy to contact you? All of these things are basic and can be achieved much more cheaply than you might expect. Experiment with templates until you are happy with your design, or hire a professional to make sure you are set to impress.

6. Meet people in person

The benefit of freelancing is that you can work from the comfort of your own home. However, meeting people in the flesh can really boost your business by helping you to promote yourself and your business and by keeping you abreast of what’s happening in the industry. BookMachine events are a good starting point. [As are SfEP local groups – Ed.]

7. Join an organisation

If you join an organisation and commit to attending events and participating in forums, you have the added impetus to do so. As co-founder of BookMachine, my interest here is in letting you know that as an SfEP member, you get £10 off an annual ‘Promoted BookMachine Membership’ (see the BookMachine page in the Members’ area of the SfEP website for details). This gives you free access to all BookMachine events and most book fairs too. Conversely, as a BookMachine member, you would get a waiver of the SfEP’s member admin fee, saving you £32 on your first year’s membership. Please drop us a line to take up either offer.

8. Learn to say no

Finally, if you are in the habit of taking whatever work you can get, then stop it. It makes sense in year 1, when you are establishing your credentials and building a list of testimonials. After that, if a job doesn’t pay enough or you don’t find it interesting, then just turn it down. Your time is your most precious commodity so don’t settle for less, and make 2017 the year you get what you are worth.

Laura Summers is co-founder of BookMachine – the community for people who make publishing happen. As well as organising events for the industry, BookMachine manage an online network of professionals sharing advice and knowledge. Laura and her team are also available to manage events, business development and marketing projects for small and mid-sized publishers.

 

Posted by Tracey Roberts, SfEP blog coordinator

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP

SfEP social media and blog round-up October 2016

In case you missed them, here are some of the most popular links and members’ blogs shared across the SfEP’s social media channels (Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn) in October.

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The history behind 8 Halloween words

Problem Clients, Part 4: How to Attract Your Ideal Clients

Slang: the changing face of cool

10 popular word origins that are absolute codswallop 

Infographic: the 69 rules of punctuation

What are the shortest words in English?

SfEP members’ blogs round-up

5 things to do before you send your book to a copy editor by Sara Donaldson

Being kind: coopetition versus competition by Liz Dexter

The business of editing: putting out the fire by Richard Adin

Not sure if you should hire a proofreader? Read these 4 quick tips now by Sarah Dronfield

Standing up for editing by Melanie Thompson

Author editing, authors’ editors and the perils of what to call ourselves by Kate Haigh

EPANI – who are we and what do we do? by Victoria Woodside

The perfect proofreader’s pen by Selena Class

Learning to write engaging dialogue by Mel Green

Carry on freelancing by Alexa Tewkesbury

A short dash to oblivion: 16 tips on hyphens and dashes by Howard Walwyn

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP

Social media round-up: SfEP 2016 conference

Anyone following the SfEP on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn will have seen a number of great blogs written by attendees of the 2016 conference. In case you missed them, a selection are summarised below.

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The 27th annual SfEP conference by Katherine Trail
It’s been a couple of days since I returned from my second SfEP (Society for Editors and Proofreaders) conference, and I’ve just about regained the power of speech, although I can’t guarantee this blog will make 100% sense (but when do they ever?!) …

Kat has also produced a great video blog on The value of conferences

#SfEP2016: reflections on the 2016 Society for Editors and Proofreaders conference by Hazel Bird
I spent the weekend just gone in Birmingham at the 2016 Society for Editors and Proofreaders (SfEP) conference – my fourth. There were over 30 hours of excellent CPD and networking opportunities, and I’ve emerged re-invigorated and with plenty of new ideas for my business and personal development, if a little brain-weary …

Conference Call by Sara Donaldson
At the 2015 conference, as a newbie, I felt like a rabbit in the headlights (it was the first time I’d ever met ‘real’ editors), but this year was a much more relaxed affair, meeting up with all the wonderful people I met last year who I’m proud to call friends (and some lovely new friends too).  It was more relaxed, even if I did take a wrong turning, ended up heading back out of Birmingham, and arrived at the Aston Conference centre a little shaken up (thanks SatNav app) …

Lessons from #SfEP16 by Melanie Thompson
I have been to several SfEP conferences, but this was by far the most enjoyable. I learned a lot and had a great time meeting familiar faces and making new friends. Here are my sixteen top ‘takeaways’ …

Looking back at #SfEP16 by Graham Hughes
This was my second SfEP conference, the first being last year’s gathering in York. That time, I arrived with some trepidation, as if I was going to be surrounded by veterans who were out to judge me. I soon realised, though, that this was nonsense. Everyone was there to learn, share ideas and enjoy themselves. This year, I could turn up without any of those worries. The experience that I’d gained in the last 12 months also helped me feel more confident, and being a local group coordinator had possibly even put a slight swagger into my step …

Converting put-downs into pitches by Liz Jones
I went to the SfEP conference at the weekend, had a brilliant time catching up with friends and colleagues, and came back fired up with loads of new ideas and objectives for continuing to develop my editorial business. And yet … over the course of the weekend, still I came out with some absolute clangers when called upon to describe my professional self and what I do …

Setting up Mastermind and accountability groups was mentioned as a possibility for members of the SfEP at the conference, and John Espirian discusses the key issues in his latest video blog.

Compiled and posted by Tracey Roberts, SfEP blog coordinator

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP

Social media round-up – June 2016

In case you missed them, here are some of the most popular links shared across the SfEP’s social media channels (Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn) in June.

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  1. Which words are people looking up post-Brexit? http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2016/06/word-trends-brexit/
  2. Digital publishing is now ‘fabric’, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy http://www.publishingtrainingcentre.co.uk/blogs/item/digital-publishing-is-now-fabric-but-that-doesn-t-mean-it-s-easy
  3. Shortcuts in editing (are they allowed?) http://cmosshoptalk.com/2016/06/07/shortcuts-in-editing-are-they-allowed/
  4. How well do you know football terminology? http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2016/06/football-terminology/
  5. How to work with publishers: 8 tips for freelancers https://bookmachine.org/2016/06/21/how-to-work-with-publishers-8-tips-for-freelancers/
  6. How to combine freelancing with teenagers. A (not) definitive guide http://workyourwords.co.uk/copywriter-blog/entry/how-to-combine-freelancing-with-teenagers-a-not-definitive-guide
  7. Stop. Using. Periods. Period. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/06/13/stop-using-periods-period-2/?tid=sm_tw
  8. What makes a bestseller? https://bookmachine.org/2016/06/09/what-makes-a-bestseller/
  9. But it’s nothing like the book! Why film adaptations rarely stay faithful http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/but-its-nothing-like-the-book-why-film-adaptations-rarely-stay-faithful-a7058271.html
  10. Could a movie about editing possibly be, well, genius? http://www.signature-reads.com/2016/06/could-a-movie-about-editing-possibly-be-well-genius/?platform=hootsuite

Posted by Tracey Roberts, SfEP blog coordinator

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP

May social media round-up – May 2016

share on social mediaIn case you missed them, here are some of the most popular links shared across the SfEP’s social media channels (Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn) in May.

  1. If a client complains that there are errors in the manuscript, how can an editor turn failure into success? https://www.copyediting.com/the-do-over-edit/
  2. Can I publish this photograph of the Mona Lisa? https://americaneditor.wordpress.com/2016/05/23/can-i-publish-this-photograph-of-the-mona-lisa/
  3. Are adult colouring-in books a recent fad? https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/may/21/17th-century-adult-colouring-in-book-albions-glorious-ile-michael-drayton-william-hole
  4. English Dialect Dictionary online https://stancarey.wordpress.com/2016/05/01/english-dialect-dictionary-online/
  5. Enid Blyton’s Famous Five spoof books to be published http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-36369366
  6. Printed book sales rise for first time in four years as ebooks decline http://www.theguardian.com/media/2016/may/13/printed-book-sales-ebooks-decline
  7. The editors role https://anthimeriarampant.wordpress.com/2016/05/03/the-editors-role/
  8. 5 reasons why a library is the best place to hide during a Zombie Apocalypse http://blog.oup.com/2016/05/library-hiding-zombie-apocalypse/
  9. How do you become an editor? https://nailyournovel.wordpress.com/2016/05/01/how-do-you-become-an-editor/
  10. A day in an editor’s brain http://www.stevelaube.com/day-editors-brain/

Posted by Tracey Roberts, SfEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.

SfEP social media round-up – March 2016

In case you missed them, here are some of the most popular links shared across the SfEP’s social media channels (Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn) in March.

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  1. Men make up their minds about books faster than women, study finds http://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/mar/08/men-make-up-their-minds-about-books-faster-than-women-study-finds?CMP=share_btn_tw
  2. Top 10 hateful characters you love in literature http://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/mar/02/top-10-hateful-characters-you-love-in-literature
  3. Do you know Irish verbs? Ten verbs from Northern Ireland that you’ll enjoy using http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2016/03/northern-irish-verbs/
  4. 10 reasons your web design isn’t working (and what to do about it) http://www.elegantthemes.com/blog/tips-tricks/10-reasons-your-web-design-isnt-working-and-what-to-do-instead
  5. Breaking rules and starting sentences with ‘And’ http://www.davidairey.com/starting-sentences-with-and/
  6. Should you only “edit what you know”? http://blog.editors.ca/?p=3440
  7. Fibonacci to Avogadro: numbers with names http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2016/03/numbers-with-names/
  8. Too many exclamation points? Never!!!!! U.K. educators derided for trying to police punctuation http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/too-many-exclamation-points-never-u-k-educators-derided-for-trying-to-police-punctuation
  9. Ways to make your (editorial) suggestions sound ‘softer’ and more polite http://dictionaryblog.cambridge.org/2016/03/23/you-could-always-email-him-making-suggestions-sound-nicer/
  10. Ten reasons why you should eat chocolate while reading http://www.theguardian.com/childrens-books-site/2016/mar/23/ten-reasons-why-you-should-eat-chocolate-while-reading?CMP=share_btn_tw

Posted by Tracey Roberts, SfEP blog coordinator.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP

Are you the same ‘you’ everywhere – what’s your business identity?

By Margaret Hunter

There’s an interesting discussion at the moment on the SfEP forums about choosing a name for your editing or proofreading business. Should you use your own name to emphasise that your business = you + your particular skills, choose a clever play on editing-related words, or perhaps go for something creative with no hint of what you do to pique interest and act as a conversation starter? Is it better to have a short name that’s easy to spell or go for something that people will remember? There’s a good checklist of things to consider when naming your business in a previous blog post.

That got me thinking though about the other nuggets of good practice when setting up your business that have been shared by fellow editors. What is clear is that it pays to spend some time thinking about your complete business identity – or brand. You may not have thought of yourself as needing a brand before but the businesses that look most professional, however small, are the ones with a consistent look, feel and message, wherever you encounter them.
blank notebook

A strategy for consistency

For starters, answer the following.

  • When did you last update all of your directory entries and social media profiles? Did you even remember that you had an entry in Freeindex or About.me or your local business listings?
  • Do all your profiles use the same photo or logo?
  • Did you perhaps experiment at one point with a quirky avatar that you’ve forgotten about but which still lingers out there on the web?
  • Is your ‘blurb’ consistent – perhaps just tweaked for different platforms?
  • Have you used the same branding on all your business documents – e.g. terms/contract, invoice, style sheet, information for authors?
  • When people visit your website (you do have one, don’t you?) will they recognise you as the same person/business that they’ve seen on Twitter or Facebook or LinkedIn?

Housekeeping your online presence

When prospective clients search for you online, what will they find? Have you clearly separated your personal online presence from that of your business? Crucially, is there anything from your business or personal past that you’d rather people didn’t now see? Member of the SfEP Julie Marksteiner, who started the conversation on business names, has a good strategy:

‘The first thing I did when I decided to go freelance was to Google my name, which resulted in deleting a lot of old social media accounts and cringeworthy photographs. Would rather prospective clients take notice of my proofreading, not the Myspace account from my “emo phase”!’

Resources to help

Copy-editor and proofreader Mary McCauley has a wealth of tips and resources about branding and marketing yourself as a freelancer on her blog. And if you’re serious about revamping your business identity and marketing strategy you also could get hold of proofreader Louise Harnby’s book Marketing Your Editing & Proofreading Business.

Margaret HunterMargaret Hunter (daisyeditorial.co.uk) is a freelance copy-editor, proofreader and book formatter, and is also marketing and PR director of the SfEP.

Proofread by Advanced Professional Member Liz Jones

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP