Kick-start your freelancing business in 2017

Every year is the year you are going to be your best. Each and every January you vow to make amends and to take your business to new heights. This year, 2017, will be different. Below we have listed 8 ways that you can make it happen this year. With things you can do from the sofa to ways you can expand your current business pipeline – this handy list from BookMachine is all you need.

1. Social media

Successful business owners are not on social media all day long. However, they do know how to use it to their benefit. Allocate a set amount each day to interact with your followers. Share relevant news, and be interested as well as interesting. Set up lists of your key prospects and contacts and head directly to these lists each time you log on, rather than losing hours with mindless online chatter with everyone on Twitter.

2. Re-assess your rate card

If you have been freelance for a while, chances are you have a fixed rate you have been working to for some time. A new year is the perfect time to re-assess this. Are you earning as much as you would like? Could you charge a higher hourly rate? If this isn’t possible, think about your payment terms or your charges for late delivery and payment – there are many ways you can turn your business up a notch whilst working with an existing client base.

3. Contact everyone you have ever known

Perhaps you are happy with your hourly rate and your terms but want to increase your customer base. The new year is the perfect excuse to get in touch with everyone you have ever known! Wish them a happy new year and remind them about your services and let them know how happy last year’s clients were. Don’t leave this until you aren’t busy. As you know, it can take months for a project to come to fruition, and there’s no harm in getting the wheels turning right away.

4. Befriend your competition

As a freelancer, your competition can actually enhance your business. If you work in tandem with someone who has similar skills to you, then you can pass over work to each other and essentially grow as a business – perhaps even co-branded. Similarly, someone who you perceive to be a competitor might actually have different strengths, meaning that a partnership whereby each of you takes on a different role (one copy-editor and one content editor, for example) might actually help you to expand.

5. Sort out your website

Your website is your shop window. Even if you mainly work on print projects, your prospective customers will judge you by your site. Do you have a brand? Is it modern enough? Can you find examples of client projects and is it easy to contact you? All of these things are basic and can be achieved much more cheaply than you might expect. Experiment with templates until you are happy with your design, or hire a professional to make sure you are set to impress.

6. Meet people in person

The benefit of freelancing is that you can work from the comfort of your own home. However, meeting people in the flesh can really boost your business by helping you to promote yourself and your business and by keeping you abreast of what’s happening in the industry. BookMachine events are a good starting point. [As are SfEP local groups – Ed.]

7. Join an organisation

If you join an organisation and commit to attending events and participating in forums, you have the added impetus to do so. As co-founder of BookMachine, my interest here is in letting you know that as an SfEP member, you get £10 off an annual ‘Promoted BookMachine Membership’ (see the BookMachine page in the Members’ area of the SfEP website for details). This gives you free access to all BookMachine events and most book fairs too. Conversely, as a BookMachine member, you would get a waiver of the SfEP’s member admin fee, saving you £32 on your first year’s membership. Please drop us a line to take up either offer.

8. Learn to say no

Finally, if you are in the habit of taking whatever work you can get, then stop it. It makes sense in year 1, when you are establishing your credentials and building a list of testimonials. After that, if a job doesn’t pay enough or you don’t find it interesting, then just turn it down. Your time is your most precious commodity so don’t settle for less, and make 2017 the year you get what you are worth.

Laura Summers is co-founder of BookMachine – the community for people who make publishing happen. As well as organising events for the industry, BookMachine manage an online network of professionals sharing advice and knowledge. Laura and her team are also available to manage events, business development and marketing projects for small and mid-sized publishers.

 

Posted by Tracey Roberts, SfEP blog coordinator

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP

One thought on “Kick-start your freelancing business in 2017

  1. Sally Asnicar

    I think professional development is another important one. Take some time each year to do a course or workshop to improve your skills in a specific area. It’s also a great way to network.

    Reply

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