Monthly Archives: November 2015

Beyond the proofreader’s remit?

By Liz Jones

When proofreading materials for book and journal publishers, we are not always presented with a thorough brief and there is often a tacit understanding of what the role of the proofreader includes … and what it does not include. The SfEP sets out some commonly understood responsibilities of the proofreader and the copy-editor in the traditional publishing process. However, it’s apparent that these roles are becoming increasingly fuzzy in the academic publishing world.

Recently a discussion arose in the SfEP forums on the thorny topic of whether a proofreader should check references in an academic book as a matter of course, and exactly what that checking should entail. The original poster referred to a proofreader being expected by a client (an academic publisher) to cross-check a reference list against the in-text citations. Many experienced editors weighed in on the debate, and gradually a consensus emerged. The general understanding was that such detailed checking of references should be part of the copy-editor’s role, not the proofreader’s. In an ideal world the proofreader would then simply need to read the reference list, checking for small inconsistencies of styling or typos. Several posters said they would perform spot-checks of a few citations during such a proofread to ensure that the reference list seems to be in accord with the main body of the text. It was also pointed out that it is certainly not the proofreader’s job to check the factual accuracy of references, or even that authors’ names are spelled correctly.

work stressThe problems start when a proofreader finds (perhaps through performing spot-checks) that the references have not been properly edited, or that other errors are present, perhaps as a result of formatting. In more extreme cases the proofreader may suspect that the text and associated references have not been copy-edited at all. In this case, the proofreader is presented with a difficult choice:

  1. They can carry out the proofread as briefed and within budget, but without doing any work that might be considered beyond the remit of the proofreader. The proofreader knows that some errors are likely to remain, but decides it is not their responsibility to make the text perfect, and is not willing to reduce their hourly rate to compensate for shortcomings earlier in the publishing process.
  2. They can go beyond the standard proofreader’s remit in order to bring the book up to a publishable standard. This means the proofreader carries out a proportion of what might be considered ‘higher-level’ copy-editing work, while being paid as a proofreader. It may also entail significantly more time being spent on the job, reducing the hourly rate still further.

Neither of these solutions is ideal. As editorial professionals we tend to be hard-wired to want to help the client produce excellent work … but at the same time, as business owners we don’t want to be taken advantage of.

What should make a proofreader wary?

Sara Peacock, former chair of the SfEP, provided examples of the problems she sometimes encounters as a proofreader:

  • None of the citations cross-checked against the references list.
  • References wildly inconsistently presented, with lots of missing information.
  • Bullet lists inconsistently presented, in terms of capitalisation and punctuation.
  • Figures not correlating to text in terms of style and sometimes content, or the text referring to coloured portions when the figures are reproduced monochrome.
  • Inconsistent capitalisation in headings.
  • Lists of what is to come in the text not corresponding with the text that actually follows.

These are clearly the responsibility of the copy-editor, but as a proofreader, we do not know the reasons behind problems we may find with copy-edited text.

Experienced editor, trainer and long-standing SfEP member Melanie Thompson made the point that errors might be ‘potentially down to problems of the files not being imported correctly (tracked changes carrying across by mistake) … Could the author have been given back the [copy-edited] file and undone a lot of the good work? And then of course there’s the possibility that the publisher/client never had the material copy-edited in the first place …’

Veteran editor and SfEP member Kathleen Lyle pointed out that ‘one problem is that things can happen to the references in the gap between copy-editing and proofreading – for example, an author may decide to add some new references to bring a chapter up to date. Depending on the publisher’s workflow this new material may be dealt with in-house and not be seen by the copy-editor; this could well cause discrepancies of style or content between text and list. As a proofreader I’d expect to pick up discrepancies of style in the text or list, and cross-check any strange-looking items.’

From these comments alone it is clear that text may appear badly edited for a number of reasons, including lack of time and budget, or technical glitches. There is also the possibility that the copy-editor lacked training, or tried to get away with providing substandard work due to other pressures. It is also a fact that many in-house editors and project managers are very pushed for time and may not be able to closely monitor and assess the work of all their suppliers on every job. (I say this as a former in-house editor.)

What can we do?

If we find ourselves presented with poorly edited text as a proofreader, there is a third way (beyond the stark dilemma presented above).

First, we can establish the brief. Gillian Clarke, trainer to many editors over several decades via the SfEP and the PTC, said simply that ‘it is hugely important to establish from the very beginning exactly what the client wants’. This can help at whatever stage in the process we are working. If the client hasn’t provided a clear brief, consider sending them your own checklist of tasks covered by proofreading (and not).

Assuming that the brief is clear, you can then try the following if presented with text from a publisher that needs a lot more attention than a straightforward proofread.

  • Assess the work: Does the budget cover what you need to do? Is it within your capabilities in the time allowed? If the answer to these questions is yes, and the job is fairly self-contained, you might decide in that case simply to get on with it and provide feedback for the publisher along with delivery of the completed work.
  • Raise the issue: If the budget and schedule do not allow for satisfactory completion of the job, or if you feel the work goes beyond what you are comfortable doing – in short, if there is any reason why you think a job is not possible within the given parameters – tell the client straight away, and wait for their response before proceeding. If they don’t answer first time, try again – this is important.
  • Ask for more money/time: If the client can offer more of either or both, the issue might be resolved in the short term, enabling you to complete the job.
  • Adopt a pragmatic attitude: If the client will not budge on money or the schedule, and you decide to proceed with the work, be strict with yourself about what you can and can’t do with the available resources, make sure the client is aware of this, do the job and move on.

However you deal with the job, you should make it clear in your handover notes to the client what the editorial shortcomings were when the project reached you, and what you had to do as a result. Be clear and matter-of-fact about the ways in which you needed to go above and beyond in order to complete your work, without making assumptions or personal attacks. You need to do this because the client might otherwise remain unaware of the issue. However, you don’t need to start telling them what to do with this information.

Questioning clients and (re)negotiating rates can be daunting, especially for newer proofreaders and editors. It’s also tempting for proofreaders just starting out to go above and beyond to try to impress new clients and secure future work. This is where discussion in the SfEP forums, on other online platforms or with your local group can help enormously.

Summary

This really all boils down to the simple question of whether the proofreader should have to compensate for inadequate copy-editing. It’s the client’s budget or yours – something has to give.

However, it also has wider implications for our industry, perhaps most pressingly in the academic publishing sector. A lack of investment in careful editing by trained professionals may help publishers balance the books in the short term, but the eventual outcome will surely be a drop in the overall quality of output, and a growing reluctance among the more experienced proofreaders to work for certain clients at all, which would surely be much more detrimental in the long term.

Next controversial topic: how far should a proofreader go in checking an index …?

Liz JonesLiz Jones (www.ljed.co.uk) has worked as an editor in the publishing industry since 1998, and has been freelance since 2008. She specialises in trade non-fiction and educational publishing, and is an Advanced Professional Member of the SfEP.

 

 

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.

Christmas gifts for book and word lovers

OK, so I ranted to friends the other week about seeing a giant inflatable Santa outside our local garden centre BEFORE HALLOWEEN, but even I have to admit that we’re now pushing towards December and haven’t got much time left for buying presents by post. So here are some ideas for Christmas gifts for your fellow grammar nerds word lovers, or to add to your own letters to Santa…

  1. Harris tweed pencil case: https://folksy.com/items/4214762-Harris-Tweed-pencil-case-zippered-pouch-in-mustard-and-steel-grey-checkHarris tweed pencil case
  2. Quotation mark earrings: https://www.etsy.com/listing/255810856/earrings-quotation-speech-marks-bookquotation marks earrings
  3. Banned books socks: http://www.theliterarygiftcompany.com/banned-books-socks-48474-p.aspbanned books socks
  4. Recycled wood fountain pen: http://www.notonthehighstreet.com/auraque/product/morley-recycled-wood-fountain-penrecycled wood fountain pen
  5. Alice in Wonderland cushion: https://www.etsy.com/listing/235304408/alice-in-wonderland-throw-pillow-choose?ref=shop_home_active_8Alice in Wonderland cushion
  6. Book in the bath caddy: http://www.theliterarygiftcompany.com/aquala-bath-caddy-3157-p.aspbath caddy
  7. Your name in crochet: https://folksy.com/items/4391633-Your-Name-in-Crochet-6-letters-e-g-ALEXIA-BARNEY-DANIEL-RACHELyour name in crochet
  8. Great British ‘bark-off’ apron: http://www.notonthehighstreet.com/sweetwilliamdesigns/product/jack-russell-great-british-bark-off-apronGreat British Bark-off apron
  9. Letter cookie cutters: http://www.bodleianshop.co.uk/gifts/gifts-for-writers/letterpressed-cookie-cutters.htmlletters cookie cutters
  10. Book phone case: https://folksy.com/items/6318591-Book-Phone-Case-for-iPhone-4-4S-5-5S-5C-6-6-Plus-and-Samsung-Galaxy-S3-S4books phone case

Happy shopping!

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.

Margaret Hunter

 

Posted by Margaret Hunter, SfEP marketing and PR director.

Social media round-up – October 2015

In case you missed them, here are some of the most popular links shared across the SfEP’s social media channels (Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn) and blog in October.
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  1. An editor on why she proofreads: writethroughitblog.com/2015/09/29/why-i-proofread/
  2. Want to speak with the eloquence of a Jane Austen character? The Jane Austen centre has launched a daily quote app: www.adweek.com/galleycat/jane-austen-centre-launches-a-daily-quote-app/111814
  3. 12 Excel formulas, features and keyboard shortcuts everyone should know: blog.hubspot.com/marketing/excel-formulas-keyboard-shortcuts
  4. The evolution of punctuating paragraphs: mentalfloss.com/article/69847/evolution-punctuating-paragraphs-through-5-specific-markers
  5. Breaking the freelance feast-or-famine cycle: www.ivacheung.com/2015/10/laura-poole-breaking-the-feast-or-famine-cycle-beyond-the-red-pencil-2015/
  6. Who would contact your clients if you got hit by a bus? blog.sfep.org.uk/succession-planning-for-your-business-after-you-die/
  7. Unfinished story … how the ellipsis arrived in English literature: www.theguardian.com/books/2015/oct/20/unfinished-story-how-the-ellipsis-arrived-in-english-literature
  8. Fact or fiction: 6 things about SEO that you should probably be aware of: www.elegantthemes.com/blog/tips-tricks/fact-or-fiction-6-things-about-seo-that-you-should-probably-be-aware-of
  9. Secrets of the MS Word ‘Ribbon’: americaneditor.wordpress.com/2015/10/19/lyonizing-word-secrets-of-the-ribbon/
  10. Should you take editorial tests for prospective new clients? blog.sfep.org.uk/taking-editorial-tests-for-clients/
  11. How has the Great British Bake Off changed the English language? blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2015/10/great-british-bake-off-language/
  12. Getting your kids on board: Strategies to get your kids to cooperate during your work hours www.freelancewritinggigs.com/2014/03/getting-kids-board-strategies-get-kids-cooperate-work-hours
  13. Want to know about Word’s lesser-known but easier-to-use search options? americaneditor.wordpress.com/2015/09/30/lyonizing-word-but-wait-theres-more/
  14. 53 wonderfully pointless facts about the English language: www.buzzfeed.com/paulanthjones/extraordinary-language-facts-you-never-knew-you-needed#.gpvnO5xw8

Posted by Margaret Hunter, SfEP marketing and PR director

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP