Monthly Archives: August 2014

Meet the SfEP conference sponsors

London Royal Holloway - the venue for the 25th SfEP annual conference 13-15 September 2014

London Royal Holloway – the venue for the 25th SfEP annual conference

So, you’re off to the SfEP conference. You’ve booked your workshops, you’re finalising your travel arrangements and you’re wondering what to wear to the Gala dinner. But have you thought about how to make the most of our exhibition?

Whether you want to find out more about software that will streamline your operations, you’re looking for a training course, or you’re looking at ways to reduce your stress levels, you’ll find something of interest among our conference exhibitors.

Here, we give you the lowdown on our conference sponsors, including their profiles, so you can decide which ones to visit at the exhibitors’ fair and prepare any questions when you visit the stands.

Sponsors

The Publishing Training Centre and The Publishing Qualifications Board

Whether you’re just starting your career in proofreading or editing, or you are looking at further developing your skill set, The Publishing Training Centre (PTC) is definitely worth a visit. The PTC is sponsoring the Whitcombe Lecture.

The Publishing Training Centre and The Publishing Qualifications Board profile:

‘The Publishing Training Centre (PTC) supports organisations and individuals that utilise publishing skills as a critical part of their operations by delivering classroom based and distance learning courses. The distance learning courses are provided under the auspices of The Publishing Qualifications Board that was established in 1991 as the awarding body for the vocational qualifications of the publishing industry. Later this year The Publishing Qualifications Board is being re-born as the PQB. In addition to accrediting the distance learning courses, PQB will provide a comprehensive Continuing Professional Development framework for publishing professionals.’

Inera Inc.

Ensuring references are correctly formatted can be a thankless task. However, Inera Inc. could come to the rescue with their tools, which automatically correct, link and format references. Inera – Innovation for Today, Resources for Tomorrow – is the firm that created eXtyles® and Edifix®. Inera is sponsoring Anne Waddingham’s ‘Working with Word’s styles’ workshop.

Inera profile:

‘Inera is a leading developer of sophisticated editorial and production solutions for the publishing world. Our eXtyles® suite of editorial and XML solutions are used in the production of journals, books, standards, and government documents in more than twenty-five countries. What sets us apart are the unique features and unparalleled quality of our products and services, and the relationships we build with our customers.

Manual curation of references is costly, time consuming, tedious, and error prone. Edifix® automatically edits plain-text references to popular editorial styles such as AMA, APA 5, APA 6, Chicago, ICMJE (Vancouver), ISO 690, and MLA. References are also linked to PubMed and CrossRef and corrected with data retrieved from these online resources. Results can be pasted into Word, saved to JATS XML, or converted to RIS for seamless integration with popular reference managers. Edifix® is built with proven eXtyles® reference processing technology, used by the leading scientific publishers worldwide, and is available by flexibly priced subscription, making it affordable for everyone, from individual users to large enterprises.’

Intelligent Editing – PerfectIt

If you’re looking for software that will pick up inconsistencies in documents, Intelligent Editing’s PerfectIt is worth a look. We mentioned it in our blog post on Computer Tools for Proofreaders. PerfectIt is sponsoring the exhibitors’ fair.

Intelligent Editing – PerfectIt profile:

‘PerfectIt saves time and helps editors deliver better documents. More than 250 members of the SfEP use PerfectIt to find difficult to locate mistakes. In seconds, PerfectIt can find inconsistent hyphenation, acronyms that haven’t been defined, list punctuation errors, capitalisation inconsistencies, and much more. PerfectIt is designed for professionals and is easy to download, install and use. A free trial is available from: www.intelligentediting.com.’

Exhibitors

BioExact

If you specialise in the life sciences or if you know an author or publisher involved in biological or medical sciences, then BioExact is definitely worth a visit. The firm specialises in editing manuscripts and also offers an editing service for abstracts and press releases for publications or conferences.

BioExact profile:

‘BioExact is a UK-based, online service that specialises in editing manuscripts for life science publications. Abstracts and press releases for publications or conferences, are currently edited free of charge. Authors and publishers are welcome to call (0844 800 4044) for an informal discussion about their editing needs. Visit bioexact.co.uk for further information about services and prices.’

Mariette Jansen / Dr De-Stress

Feeling stressed? Do you get anxious? Are deadlines getting you down? Is your life getting out of control? Visit Mariette Jansen, also known as Dr De-Stress for information on how to regain control of your life.

Mariette Jansen / Dr De-Stress profile:

‘Dr Mariette Jansen (aka Dr De-Stress) is an expert in helping people with stress related challenges. Using her knowledge and experience as a psychotherapist, tutor in counselling education and author about mindfulness meditation, she has created a range of tools that help clients to take charge of their stress levels. Stress is caused by the (perceived) lack of control and by understanding the dynamics of stress and learning tools to deal differently with it, people can change their lives around. Dr Jansen has been awarded for her stress management technique by Janey Lee Grace (radio and TV presenter, author and founder of www.imperfectlynatural.com), has written a series of articles for ‘the Guardian’, is a published author and offers personal coaching, tuition, and workshops.’

EM Words – Elizabeth Manning Murphy DE

We all love books, so you’ll definitely want to take a look at editor, writer, mentor and trainer Elizabeth Manning Murphy DE. She will be selling her study guide, Effective writing: plain English at work and her book about editing and writing, Working Words, which, among other things, tackles the well-known curse of editors and authors: ‘itchypencilitis’.

EM Words profile:

‘Elizabeth Manning Murphy is a distinguished Editor (IPEd, Australia), an Honorary Life Member of the Canberra Society of Editors, and has an Honours degree in Linguistics. She has been editing, writing, training and mentoring in Australia and internationally for more than 40 years. She specialises in academic editing – theses and scholarly journal articles, with a special interest in helping authors whose native language is not English.

Elizabeth is an acclaimed author of many books about editing, writing and business, most recently a second edition of her popular study guide ‘Effective writing: plain English at work’ and ‘Working Words’, a collection of ‘chats’ about editing and writing. Her training focuses on English grammar and plain English as a basis from which to build a good relationship between editor and client. She is an experienced teacher, mentor and speaker to large and small groups.’

John Linnegar

Many of us work with authors from around the world, so a book that reflects international best practice is of real value. Especially when it includes details of a systematic approach to efficiently tackle texts. John Linnegar will be selling Text Editing: A handbook for students and practitioners in the exhibitors’ fair.

John Linnegar profile:

‘Co-author with professors WAM Carstens (North-West University, South Africa) and Kris Van de Poel (Antwerp University, Belgium), John Linnegar was largely responsible for translating and adapting the published source text into ‘Text Editing: A handbook for students and practitioners’ (UPA, Brussels, 2012). This publication is expressly intended for an international audience of language practitioners and has been favourably reviewed and well received in Western Europe, Australia, South Africa, and also in the UK. Unlike similar publications aimed at text editors and associated language practitioners, ‘Text Editing’ reflects international best practice in the most accessible and practical of ways. 

A core feature of the book and its approach is the so-called ‘CCC Model’, the 15 evaluation points of which – covering important facets of documents such as text type, content, structure, wording and presentation – provide the most systematic approach to analysing, evaluating and improving texts yet published. The list of resources available to practitioners is one of the most comprehensive yet published. Copies can be obtained during the SfEP annual conference. Alternatively, they can be ordered either directly from Antwerp-based John Linnegar (info@editandtrain.com) or via the University Press Antwerp website (www.aspeditions.be).’

Oxford University Press – Oxford Language Editing

Do you specialise in academic editing? If so, you’ll definitely want to visit the Oxford University Press stand and find out more about its new Oxford Language Editing service.

Oxford University Press – Oxford Language Editing profile:

‘Oxford Language Editing is a new service from Oxford University Press for academic researchers around the world, helping ensure that academic writing is published in the highest-quality English, giving ideas the best chance of making an impact. The service draws on OUP’s extensive English language knowledge through its publishing of the Oxford English Dictionary, over 300 leading academic journals, and award-winning books in a wide number of subjects. We offer English language editing and abstract editing services in a variety of disciplines.’

Reedsy

Interest in self-publishing continues to grow, so anyone working with authors who are self-publishing might want to investigate Reedsy, which operates as a marketplace where self-publishing authors can find all the experts they need to launch their book.

Reedsy profile:

‘Reedsy is a curated marketplace for self-publishing authors. We allow them to find vetted, industry-experienced editors, cover designers, publicists and translators, compare their profiles, request quotes and samples, and ultimately work together. But Reedsy is more than just a marketplace. We provide innovative collaboration tools to keep the workflow on one platform, both for the authors and for the freelancers. Think of it as a project management tool. We have also developed a new writing software optimised for author-editor collaboration, with an inbuilt track changes system, and simplified conversion to the electronic formats. In a word, Reedsy can make authors’ and editors’ lives much easier.’

The SfEP is extremely grateful to all our conference sponsors and we hope this guide helps you make the most of the exhibitors’ fair. Let us know which stands you plan to visit.

Joanna Bowery

Joanna Bowery
SfEP Social Media Manager

Joanna Bowery is the SfEP social media manager. As well as looking after the SfEP’s Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn accounts and the SfEP blog, she offers freelance marketing, PR, writing and proofreading services operating as Cosmic Frog. Jo is an associate of the SfEP and a Chartered Marketer. She is active on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+.

This article was proofread by SfEP associate Karen Pickavance.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.

Look for pleasure in editing

Pleasure in editingProofreaders and editors love examining the text on which they are working. This is also the case with subeditors. Here, Humphrey Evans, subeditor, former tutor on the National Union of Journalists (NUJ) ‘Getting started as a freelance’ course, and author of e-books such as Edit: 23 Guidances for Editors, Subeditors and Copyeditors, talks about how to find pleasure in subediting.

Deep into reading a newspaper article about a woman’s relationship with her grandmother, I came across this sentence: ‘Her diaries were a thing of lore, huge tombs that looked like the Magna Carta, filled with pages of inky writings.’ I liked that reference to ‘huge tombs’ rather than ‘tomes’. It’s a mistake, and a mistake I feel should have been picked up by whoever subedited the piece, but it’s a mistake with wings.

It does raise the idea of diaries as tombs – for all those happenings and hopes and wishes recorded day by day. It raises, too, the idea of ‘tome-stones’, rows of large and worthy books that might furnish a room in some sense but are unlikely to be taken down and read.

Subediting offers up these flashes that enliven the humdrum checking of this and correcting of that. I was listening to a late-night radio programme devoted to the topic of subediting once, one in a series about words and their place in the world, when they interviewed a woman who worked as a subeditor at The Sun. She told how she’d been asked to handle a squib about Scottish men spending more and more money on grooming products. She’d worked her way to the headline ‘Robert the Spruce’ and you could still hear the pleasure she’d found in coming up with that.

Pleasure in subediting seemed to me the attitude to take when I had the chance to write for the Chief Sub column in the Journalist, the magazine of the National Union of Journalists (NUJ).

The then editor, Tim Gopsill, had established the column to shine some light on one of those journalistic skills that could so often be overlooked. His main contributor was Wynford Hicks, author of English for Journalists, which, according to one of the reviews (the one I wrote) is ‘… a jolly useful book. It’s short. It’s accessible. It’s cheap. And it tells you what you want to know.’

I lobbed in an interest in some of the odder byways of subediting, such as the ins and outs (or possibly in’s and out’s) of apostrophes.

I realised that people did actually read the pieces when someone wrote in to say I’d made a mistake. I hadn’t fully understood the intricacies of whether or not London’s Earls Court has an apostrophe. It doesn’t, except for the fact that the station and some of the nearby roads appear to have acquired one. Tim asked me if I had a response, so I was able to see this printed right beside the letter that provoked it: ‘Your reader is right. I was wrong. I am sorry. I will never believe anything I read in the Journalist again.’

Maybe not. But believe these pieces which, in the main, come from the Journalist. You don’t necessarily have to follow all the advice – but you will, hopefully, find that you have learnt a bit about editing and subediting and been entertained along the way.

What do you enjoy most about editing?

Humphrey Evans

Humphrey Evans

Humphrey Evans has spent 40 years subediting and writing and proofreading and teaching subediting and writing and proofreading, quite often for the National Union of Journalists (NUJ) where, for a long time, he was one of the tutors on the much-praised ‘Getting started as a freelance’ course. ‘Look for pleasure in editing’ is the result. Humphrey has written books including: Edit: 23 Guidances for Editors, Subeditors and Copyeditors; More Edit: 20 Guidances for Editors, Subeditors and Copyeditors, which is based on his experiences as Chief Sub; and Subedit: 25 Instructories for Anyone who has to Sub.

Proofread by Thomas Hawking.

The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the SfEP.